Article Results for "Austin"

Traces of UTSOA’s First Century

by: Allison Gaskins

This past fall, the University of Texas at Austin’s School of Architecture celebrated its centennial with various symposia, lectures, and gatherings held under the banner of “UTSOA 100: Traces & Trajectories.”

J. Hal Box, Perkins + Will, RNL Design, Austin History Center/Austin Public Library
Page 84

Speck Awarded AIA Topaz Medallion

by: TA Staff

Lawrence Speck, FAIA, professor and former dean at the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture and a principal of Page Southerland Page, has been awarded the American Institute of Architects’ 2011 Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architecture Education.

Page 12

The Shape of Texas and Austin Firm Recognized with 2011 THC Awards

by: TA Staff

Each year the Texas Historical Commission recognizes individuals, organizations, and programs that have achieved success in efforts to preserve the state’s architectural heritage. Included in the 2011 THC program are awards for The Shape of Texas radio program and the Austin architecture firm Clayton & Little Architects.

Page 19

Water-Wise

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects

The lower Colorado River’s expansive watershed touches on the lives of more than one million residents of 56 counties in central Texas. Managing supplies of drinking water from the river and harnessing its powerful flow for hydroelectricity are part of the Lower Colorado River Authority’s multi-faceted mission. However, the public utility’s most visible role involves the controlled release of water through six dams along the river’s 600-mile run to the Gulf of Mexico.

Thomas McConnell, Greg Hursley
Page 34

Midcentury Update

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: McKinney York Architects

McGarrah Jessee’s relocation to larger quarters in downtown Austin neatly coincides with the home-grown creative agency’s bursting out of its regional sphere of influence. Affectionately known as McJ, the company has steadily ratcheted up its staffing level as its roster of clients has expanded and its recognition for innovative and hugely successful advertising and branding campaigns has gone national. In December, after having outgrown its former offices in a converted warehouse, McJ re-established its base of operations in a former bank building, a midcentury treasure that had fallen on hard times.

Thomas McConnell
Page 52

Catalyst for Enlivening Austin’s Center, ‘Great Streets’ Proceeds Block by Block

by: Stephen Sharpe

Over a decade i n development, the City of Austin’s capital improvements program called Great Streets is changing the character of its downtown by broadening sidewalks and adding amenities to enhance the pedestrian realm.

Mike Knox, Jorge Rousselin, City of Austin
Page 14

Sisters’ Retreat

by: Matt Fajkus
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

“Light, space and order—these are the things that humans need just as much as they need bread or a place to sleep.” Le Corbusier’s observation of these three essential elements comes to mind when visiting the Sisters Retreat pool house and pavilion by Mell Lawrence Architects. Though the project possesses the typical attributes one might associate with a small recreational program, the unique quality of the design is manifest both in the overall layout as well as in its materiality and detailing, all of which embrace light in nuanced ways.

Mell Lawrence, JH Jackson Photography
Page 34

Sweet Leaf Tea Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Wiese Hefty Design Build

Designed by San Antonio firm Wiese Hefty Design Build, the Austin headquarters of Sweet Leaf Tea highlights the company’s brand while also displaying its eclectic office culture. The architects used building information modeling (BIM) software to design the almost 8,000-sf space, which is an adaptive reuse of a 1918 building in the Penn Field office complex.

Philip Thomas
Page 69

After Closing Gavel of Regular Session, TSA Sees Benefits to Architects Statewide

by: Stephen Sharpe

When the 82nd Legislature convened in January, expectations were low for the state’s architectural profession. The biggest issue facing lawmakers was a historic budget shortfall, which meant that new taxes might be levied on professional services, including those performed by architects.

Elizabeth Hackler
Page 10

Hal Box, FAIA: Visionary Educator

by: Lawrence Speck

Hal Box, FAIA, had a greater impact on architectural education in Texas than any single individual in the state’s history. He was a visionary and a consummate doer. He imagined a much more prominent position for Texas architecture in a national and international context, and he worked tirelessly and skillfully to use architectural education as a means to reach that ambitious goal.

Box Family, Marsha Miller, UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 12

Livestrong HQ in COTE Top Ten

by: TA Staff

The American Institute of Architects’ Committee on the Environment has included Lake/Flato Architect’s Livestrong Foundation’s headquarters among its 2011 Top Ten Green Projects, a national program that celebrates sustainable design excellence. Livestrong, located in Austin, was this year’s sole Texas honoree.

Paul Hester
Page 14

AIA Austin Presents Design Awards

by: Tamara L. Toon

AIA Austin honored 10 projects in its 2011 Design Awards Celebration. From a total of 77 submittals, the distinguished jury of architects selected three for Honor Awards, six for Citations of Honor, and one unbuilt project for a Studio Award.

Page 18

Mopac Trailhead

The design initiative by Miró Rivera Architects proposes a series of activity zones for a segment along the Lady Bird Lake Hike and Bike Trail in Austin where the trail extends underneath heavily trafficked Mopac Expressway (Loop 1).

Page 23

Unwrapped

by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: Clayton&Little Architects

Structures from every era of a city’s history are of immeasurable importance to the texture of a community and its sense of place. Intangible sentiments can link people to buildings through experience, memory, or imagination. Yet, many factors can lead to the decline and even the demolition of a historical structure.

Casey Dunn
Page 46

Arthouse at the Jones Center

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: LTL Architects

While it is not unusual for a renovation project to transform an individual building, it is noteworthy when such a project begins to change how people relate to the city around them.

Michael Moran
Page 44

Sisters’ Retreat

by: Matt Fajkus
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Located on a semi-urban 7.5-acre lot more than a few miles West of Austin, Sisters’ Retreat encompasses a shared pool house and play area for the families of two siblings, set amongst their small compound of homes. The site, surrounded by tall grass and within walking distance of Lake Austin, is reached by a short meander from the residences.

Hester+Hardaway Photographers, JH Jackson Photography
Page 84

Pitts Medal Goes to Cowan For Lifetime Achievement

by: Andrea Exter

Described as a “legend” by his peers, Tommy N. Cowan, FAIA, is a dedicated and lifelong leader. His interest in design and architecture began in the fifth grade when a teacher invited him to compete in Austin’s Wellesley Junior Art Show. Two of Cowan’s architectural drawings were submitted and both won top honors.

Page 14

AIA Brazos Honors Five Projects

by: Elizabeth Price, AIA

Five projects were recognized in July with AIA Brazos Design Awards from a total of 16 entries. Jurors were Michael Malone, AIA, of Michael Malone Architects in Dallas; Emily Little, FAIA, of Clayton & Little Architects in Austin; and Mark T. Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen Architects in Midland.

Page 29

Artful Infill

by: Jacqui Dodson, AIA

Driving along Austin’s 11th Street just east of downtown, the first things you’ll notice are the vivid colors – bright red, vibrant orange, and
intense yellow – on the exterior of the East Village Lofts.

Ryan Michael
Page 66

Arthouse at the Jones Center


Architect: Lewis Tsurumaki Lewis

Arthouse, the oldest statewide contemporary visual arts organization in Texas, is renovating and expanding its Jones Center space in downtown Austin.

Page 26

Campus Engagement

by: Justin Allen Howard
Architect: Prozign Architects; Sasaki Associates

Established in the heart of East Texas in 1917 and nestled among the region’s majestic pine forest, Stephen F. Austin University is quietly nurturing its student- focused campus life. The new Baker Patillo Student Center, completed in March 2007, has blossomed into a vibrant, 24-hour “town center” for the university and the town of Nacogdoches.

Richard Payne
Page 58

Preservation Texas: ‘Endangered’ Places

Each year since 2003 the nonprofit Preservation Texas presents its list of “Texas’ Most Endangered Places,” and this year’s roster of seven places, including the San Jacinto Battlefield Historic Site in Harris County. The organization’s objective is to call attention to significant places that its leadership deems imperiled by an uncertain future.

Gerald Moorhead
Page 21

Belo Center for New Media

Following a competition among 15 firms, a new 120,000-sf Belo Center for New Media is being designed by Lawrence Group Architects for the University of Texas at Austin. Serving as a northwest gateway to the campus, the building will expand facilities for the College of Communication.

Page 24

‘Lost’ in the Borderlands

by: Stephen Fox

Austin architect W. Eugene George’s classic work, Lost Architecture of the Río Grande Borderlands, has returned to print in a handsome new edition.

Page 27

Second Act

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Boora Architects; CCS & H

The 3,000-seat Nancy Lee and Perry R. Bass Concert Hall is the flagship theater of the University of Texas at Austin’s performing arts complex. Originally opened in 1981, the hall boasted an unusually large stage and generous back-of-house areas that effectively accommodated large-scale opera and dance productions. However, following the adoption in 1999 of more stringent campus-wide fire and life safety standards, the university hired Boora Architects of Portland, Oregon, to study remedial options.

Park Street; Len Allington
Page 52

AIA Houston Awards 13 Projects

by: TA Staff

Thirteen projects were selected for 2010 AIA Houston Design Awards. The jury – Brian Johnsen of Johnsen Schmaling Architects in Milwaukee, Wis.; Juan Miró, AIA, of Miró Rivera Architects in Austin; and Amanda Kolson Hurley, executive editor of Washington, D.C.-based Architect magazine – met Feb. 26 at the Architecture Center Houston to review 132 entries from 59 local firms. Awards were presented March 25 at the Rice Hotel in Houston.

Page 19

‘Looking into the Distance’

The conceptual project by UT Austin architecture students Brian Bedrosian and William Huie received first-place recognition in the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture International Student Design Competition.

Page 25

DeWitt County Courthouse

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: TWC Architects

Located in Cuero’s downtown historic district, DeWitt County Courthouse (1896) is a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, State Archeological Landmark, and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Having undergone a total interior “modernization” in 1953, the courthouse was restored in 2008 by TWC Architects of Austin as part of the Texas Historic Courthouse Preservation Program administered by the Texas Historical Commission.

Page 69

AIA Austin Awards 15 Projects

by: Rick Price

Fifteen projects were selected for the 2010 AIA Austin Design Awards in April. The jury was comprised of Merrill Elam, AIA, of Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects in Atlanta, Ga.; Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, of Marlon Blackwell Architect in Fayetteville, Ark.; and Michael Imber, FAIA, of Michael G. Imber Architects in San Antonio. The three jurors reviewed over 100 submittals at the AIA Austin Center for Architecture.

Page 16

Waller Creek Master Plan

“Tailor the District,” a concept for reinvigorating a downtrodden corner of downtown Austin, uses Waller Creek as the central seam around which patches of social fabric (i.e., places of local commerce, open space, and entertainment venues) are stitched together by a unified circulation network.

Page 20

Cotillion Pavilion

Designed by Mell Lawrence Architects of Austin, the Cotillion Pavilion replaces an existing shade structure at Cotillion Park in northeast Dallas. Scheduled for completion later this year, the project is part of the City of Dallas Park and Recreation Department’s long-range strategic plan to restore or replace aging picnic pavilions throughout the city.

Page 20

Hideaway in Plain Sight

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: David Heymann, Architect

Set on the crest of a prominent hill west of downtown Austin and oriented to command an unobstructed view of the skyline, the Hilltop House itself is visible from many points around the city.

David Heymann; Paul Bardagjy
Page 38

View from the Top

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: Ziegler Cooper Architects

Distant views of central Austin have a way of appearing suddenly as a result of Austin’s perch on the edge of the Hill Country. Until recently, downtown’s most visible landmark has been the icily geometric Frost Bank Tower, built in 2004 and reaching 515 feet high, offering a counterpoint to the occasional warm glow of the University of Texas Tower to the north of downtown and the Victorian dome of the Texas State Capitol.

McConnell Photography
Page 52

Paggi House

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: J Square Architecture

Sited on a bluff overlooking Austin’s downtown skyline and Lady Bird Lake, the Paggi House recently underwent renovations that restore the original 1840s structure while adding a contemporary twist. Re-imagined by J Square Architecture, the 5,523-sf restaurant, which once served as an inn and a family home, gained a new roof, outdoor bar/dining space, restroom, and office.

J Square Architecture; Rebecca Fondren Photography
Page 58

Revamped Arthouse to Open in Fall

by: Noelle Heinze

Austin’s Arthouse at the Jones Center is set to re-open Oct. 22 after a $6 million renovation and expansion. The 20,830-sf contemporary arts center makes its debut with an inaugural exhibit, More Art about Buildings and Food, by Jason Middlebrook.

Images Courtesy Arthouse
Page 16

Hutto City Hall Complex

Austin-based architecture and planning firm Antenora Architects recently completed the schematic design phase for a new Hutto City Hall, with an adjacent multi-purpose building and municipal park.

Page 25

The Lance Armstrong Foundation Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Lake/Flato Architects in collaboration with the Bommarito Group

Entering the Lance Armstrong Foundation (Livestrong) headquarters is an exercise in transition—from busy streetscape through serene garden to an open, sunlit interior. Transition also characterizes the conversion of the 1950s-era warehouse into the Livestrong offices, considering that a wide variety of the project’s materials were salvaged from the original structure.

Casey Dunn; Paul Hester
Page 44

Stone Creek Camp

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Andersson-Wise Architects

“Beauty alone doesn’t hold your interest for very long. You want things to be a little… scary. But the kind of awe that derives from nature is extraordinarily tranquil.” So muses Arthur Andersson, AIA, in the recently published Natural Houses that features several projects designed by Andersson-Wise Architects, the Austin firm led by him and Chris Wise, AIA. Prominently showcased in the book is Stone Creek Camp, a backwoods hideaway built on a ridge overlooking Flathead Lake in rural northwestern Montana. The elegantly rusticated encampment comprises eight small buildings strategically arrayed across the steeply sloping site, each positioned to foster an individual and collective sense of refuge.

Art Gray
Page 68

East Windsor Residence

by: Ingrid Spencer
Architect: alterstudio architects

According to Kevin Alter, the 4,200-sf, three -story East Windsor Residence is essentially a one-bedroom loft because the top floor “has all the pleasures and attributes of a penthouse and then it expands down to give you all this other stuff.” The project was designed by Alter, along with alterstudio architects co-principal Ernesto Cragnolino, AIA, with a focus on the third level, which boasts 270-degree views and contains the master suite, kitchen, and main living area. But the “other stuff” found on the remaining two levels completes this finely crafted house in dynamic and dramatic ways.

Paul Finkel; Jonathan Jackson
Page 76

Barton Place

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: BOKA Powell Architects

Designed by BOKA Powell Architects, Barton Place is a six-story, multi-building condominium complex located south of downtown Austin. Six buildings and an elevated plaza landscaped with native plants rest above a twolevel underground parking garage.

Patrick Wong
Page 85

Worst-Case Scenario

by: Stephen Sharpe

In contrast to the photographs that illustrate the mixed-use projects profiled in this edition’s feature section, the University Park development in Austin is not a pretty picture. The owner’s ambitious plans for a high-density urban village on 23 acres along I-35 just north of downtown have fizzled, leaving a half-empty office building to stand alone amid an otherwise abandoned construction site. Tenants are angry, neighbors are frustrated, and everyone else is wondering how things went so wrong.

Roma Austin
Page 5

Cedar Park Recreation Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: PBS&J

The City of Cedar Park commissioned PBS&J of Austin to provide architectural and engineering services for the development of a 50,000-sf community and recreation center located in the city’s evolving downtown district.

Roy Mata
Page 61

Worst-Case Scenario

by: Stephen Sharpe

For the past four years, the members of AIA Austin have volunteered their time to teach elementary school students in their area about architecture. Their most recent efforts culminated in November with displays at UT Austin of models the kids devised to illustrate the lessons they have learned. This year’s program reached more than 315 students from third, fourth, and fifth grades.

John Cameron, Assoc. AIA
Page 5

Texas State University Master Plan

Developed by Broaddus & Associates of Austin with Baltimore-based Ayers/Saint/Gross as consultants, the master plan for Texas State University in San Marcos was launched in 2004 to address a projected student enrollment increase of 30,000 and a need for additional academic facilities for 2015 and beyond.

Page 26

The Blanton That Could Have Been

by: J. Brantley Hightower

While studying at UT Austin in the spring of 1998, my classmates and I had the opportunity to attend a series of public lectures given by the seven short-listed architects for the Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art. The list was impressive and when Herzog & de Meuron was ultimately chosen we were thrilled by the prospect of what the Swiss firm would design. The insertion of a thoughtful work within the Spanish Mediterranean-style campus was certainly something to be eagerly anticipated.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA ; Illustration by Richard Carman, courtesy Herzog & de Meuron and UT Austin
Page 27

Mexican Modern In East Austin

by: Mario L. Sanchez, PhD
Architect: Cotera+Reed Architects

Founded in 1987, Southwest Key Programs, a national non-profit group based in Austin, manages a variety of social programs to benefit disadvantaged youth and their families. Intending for its new headquarters to act as a tool for neighborhood revitalization, the organization selected a site in a traditionally under-served area of the city to locate the Southwest Key East Austin Community Development Project.

Mike Osborne
Page 52

Educating the Educators

by: James Kirkpatrick AIA

Who knew that homework was still being assigned so many years after completing school? In preparation to sit on the jury for the 2008 TASA/TASB Exhibit of School Architecture, I spent about 30 hours studying the 96 entries prior to the meeting in Austin. I combed through all of them at least four times, all the while keeping in mind the criteria—design, educational appropriateness, innovation, process of planning, sustainability, and value

Page 68

Outlook for a Downturn

by: Stephen Sharpe

Just how troublesome are current economic conditions in Texas? To gain insight, Texas Architect invited six architects to join a roundtable discussion where they were asked to assess their local markets and offer near-term forecasts. The roundtable discussion took place in Austin on Jan. 19.

Julie Pizzo; original photography by istock and shutterstock
Page 30

Artistic Makeover

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Nelsen Partners in association with Zeidler Partnership

n its metamorphosis from the “turtle shell”-domed Lester E. Palmer Auditorium, the Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Center for the Performing Arts had several false starts over the course of two decades. The project’s protracted gestation has ultimately yielded a more stripped-down facility than that suggested during its early stages, however, the new structure respectfully acknowledges its iconic forebear while doing more with less.

Dan Gruber; Thomas McConnell; G. Russ Images
Page 40

AT&T Conference Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: HKS Architects (architect of record) and Lake|Flato Architects (design architect)

The AT &T Executive Education and Conference Center opened in 2008 on the University of Texas campus in Austin. Designed by Lake/Flato Architects, in collaboration with HKS, the conference center “…adheres to goals of the campus master plan by borrowing very specifically from the materials of the campus as well as the massing and the fenestration of the original 40 acres,” said principal design architect David Lake, FAIA .

Blake Martin, HKS
Page 70
View: 25 50 100 All