Article Results for "Dallas"

March Opening for Calatrava Bridge

by: Michael Malone, AIA

Still another few months away from completion, the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge already stands out from the other iconic profiles
that make up the skyline of Dallas. Designed by Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava, the bridge is the most conspicuous component of the ongoing improvements to the Trinity River.

Jeremy Dickie
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AIA Brazos Honors Five Projects

by: Elizabeth Price, AIA

Five projects were recognized in July with AIA Brazos Design Awards from a total of 16 entries. Jurors were Michael Malone, AIA, of Michael Malone Architects in Dallas; Emily Little, FAIA, of Clayton & Little Architects in Austin; and Mark T. Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen Architects in Midland.

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KRob Recognizes Drawing Excellence

by: Julien Meyrat

The results of the 35th Annual Ken Roberts Memorial Delineation Competition were announced on Nov. 19. Commonly known as “KRob,” the events was established by AIA Dallas in 1974 to recognize excellence in the art of architectural delineation (originally hand-rendered works but later expanded to include computer-assisted drawings).

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Perot Museum of Nature and Science

Construction began in November on the Perot Museum of Nature and Science on a 4.7-acre site in the Victory development just north of downtown Dallas. Thom Mayne, FAIA, of Morphosis, designed the $185 million project as a mammoth cube that appears to float over a landscaped plinth.

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An Urban ‘Setting for People’

by: Kevin Sloan

With the opening of the spectacular AT &T Performing Arts Center still ringing in the air, the City of Dallas dedicated an urban park in November that is equally bold for different reasons. Known as the Main Street Garden, the 1.7-acre park did not emanate from a Pritzker Prize-winning architect, nor does it flaunt any enthusiasms for Pritzker Prize-like experimentation. Designed by Thomas Balsley and Associates of New York City, the park is intended to be a richly active urban space for downtown residents—a “setting for people,” in the words of its landscape architect.

Willis Winters, Thomas Balsley and Associates
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Outside the Box

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Shipley Architects

For over 23 years , Oak Hill Academy in Dallas has helped students with learning differences achieve success not commonly seen in ordinary schools. Oak Hill’s unique approach to education integrates multidisciplinary studies with individualized multi-sensory teaching, permitting children to experience lessons in a meaningful way.

Charles David Smith
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Dallas Arts District: Past and Future

by: Stephen Sharpe

The reinvigorated Dallas Arts District provides a timely opportunity to feature performance venues around the state while highlighting the Winspear Opera House and the Wyly Theatre. Both are stunning additions to the downtown cultural enclave that has evolved over three decades through the roller coaster ride of the boom-bust economic cycle.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
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Designs of Trolley Stops Chosen For Dallas’ Bustling West Village

by: Paul Pascarelli

In the heart of the lively neighborhood called Uptown Dallas, the M-Line of the McKinney Avenue Transit Authority covers a 3.5-mile circuit with a fleet of preserved historic trolley cars. The vintage trolleys are an important link in an urban mass-transit system that connects Uptown Dallas with the downtown to the south, shuttling local residents and visitors to popular restaurants, shops, and night spots. At the upper reaches of Uptown is the live/work/play enclave known as West Village, located at the intersection of McKinney and Lemmon.

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The Importance of Public Space

by: Kevin Sloan

In premodern cities, the architecture of the public domain – the temples, cathedrals, monuments and the deliberately shaped spaces around them – conferred status to citizens and communicated authority to the outside world. Central Park and Bryant Park in New York City; Golden Gate Park, Market Street and the Embarcadero in San Francisco; and the venerated Emerald Necklace in Boston are public spaces in more recent cities. In the best examples of all worlds, cities are continuous networks of humanized space.

Julien Meyrat, Kevin Sloan
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Drama Machine

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: REX/OMA architect of record Kendall/Heaton Associates

Rem Koolhaas (Pritzker honoree in 2000) and Joshua Prince-Ramus, enabled by enlightened patrons, designed the Wyly to function like no other traditional theater—vertically, with its main performance space at ground level and almost all support facilities placed at the building’s upper tiers. This daring experiment in the logistics of stagecraft exemplifies Koolhaas’s intellectual approach to re-interpreting an established building type from the ground up.

Iwan Baan, Tim Hursley
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A Generously Open House

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Foster and Partners architect of record Kendall/Heaton Associates

This refreshing urbanistic quality was introduced to the Dallas Arts District in 1989 by I.M. Pei with his Meyerson Symphony Center, followed in 2003 by Renzo Piano with the Nasher Sculpture Center. More recently, two additions to the Arts District – the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House and the Dee and Charles Wyly Theater – both have gone a step further by making it concrete and tangible.

Iwan Baan, Craig Blackmon, Tim Hursley
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Watermark Community Church

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Omniplan

In the fall of 2007, Watermark Community Church in Dallas completed phase two of a three-phase project that created an 11.5-acre campus master-planned and designed by Omniplan. First came the renovation of an eight-story office building to provide facilities for the church’s growing congregation, including spaces for adult education and children’s classes.

Peter Calvin
Page 66

Healing with Architecture

by: Stephen Sharpe

By broadening the theme for this edition to encompass wellness, TA’s staff expanded the range of feature projects beyond medical facilities. That allowed us to include The Bridge, a new homeless assistance center on the southern edge of downtown Dallas that addresses the well being of that community’s neediest residents. The Bridge, recognized for design excellence by the AIA and other national organizations, is a collaborative effort between CamargoCopeland Architects in Dallas and Overland Partners Architects in San Antonio.

Perkins + Will
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AIA Houston Awards 13 Projects

by: TA Staff

Thirteen projects were selected for 2010 AIA Houston Design Awards. The jury – Brian Johnsen of Johnsen Schmaling Architects in Milwaukee, Wis.; Juan Miró, AIA, of Miró Rivera Architects in Austin; and Amanda Kolson Hurley, executive editor of Washington, D.C.-based Architect magazine – met Feb. 26 at the Architecture Center Houston to review 132 entries from 59 local firms. Awards were presented March 25 at the Rice Hotel in Houston.

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Gail Thomas Named Honorary AIA

by: TA Staff

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has awarded honorary membership to Gail Thomas, Ph.D., president and CEO of the Trinity Trust Foundation. Honorary membership is one of the highest honors the AIA can bestow on any person outside the profession of architecture. Thomas, a Dallas resident, was recognized for her efforts to improve cities and for her support of the arts and architecture.

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Resolute Landmark

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: CamargoCopeland Architects and Overland Partners

Also dotting the landscape are landmarks from a grander but almost forgotten earlier era—including the Masonic Temple (1941; Flint & Broad), the Weisfeld Center (1912; Hubbell & Greene; originally the First Church of Christ, Scientist), and the Scottish Rite Cathedral (1913; Hubbell & Greene). Dallas City Hall, designed in 1977 by I.M. Pei with the mission of awakening Dallas from its post- JFK assassination slump, mediates between this neglected corner of downtown and the inner city’s robust commercial district. There is hope, however, for this neighborhood’s renewal since the opening in 2008 of The Bridge, a homeless assistance center funded by the City of Dallas.

Charles David Smith
Page 42

Refit for Fitness

by: Brian McLaren
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

As designed by Good Fulton & Farrell, the new Dallas facility reflects the idea of working out as if it were fashion and lifestyle more than losing weight and staying fit. Despite the people exercising everywhere and the array of equipment, this is much more about creating a retreat than it is about pumping iron.

Mark Knight Photography; GFF Media
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U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: 4240 Architecture

The 56,700-sf Department of Homeland Security U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS ) building in Dallas replaces two separate USCIS offices. Completed in 2008 and designed by 4240 Architecture of Chicago, the two-story building includes a waiting room, information counters, a processing office, and a ceremony room on the first floor.

Perzel Photography Group; Mark Olsen; BlackInk Architectural Photography by Craig Blackmon FAIA
Page 65

AIA/HUD Award for Dallas Initiative

by: TA Staff

Congo Street Green Initiative in Dallas by Building Community Workshop recently received a 2010 American Institute of Architects/U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary’s Award in the category of community-informed design.

’Before’ Photo Courtesy Building Community Workshop; ‘After’ photo courtesy Noe Medrano
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Casa Verde

Casa Verde, a conceptual project by Houston’s Morris Architects, was one of three projects awarded an Honorable Mention in the 2009 Dallas Urban Re:Vision international design competition that challenged participants to transform a 2.5-acre downtown parking lot into an entirely self-sustaining mixed-use, mixed-income development.

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Cotillion Pavilion

Designed by Mell Lawrence Architects of Austin, the Cotillion Pavilion replaces an existing shade structure at Cotillion Park in northeast Dallas. Scheduled for completion later this year, the project is part of the City of Dallas Park and Recreation Department’s long-range strategic plan to restore or replace aging picnic pavilions throughout the city.

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Intentional Grounding

by: Stephen Sharpe

Texas St adium collapsed on April 11 in a well-executed implosion detonated at 7:08 a.m. that ended a storied 37-year career as the home of the Dallas Cowboys. In less than 30 seconds and before more than 20,000 witnesses, a spectacular series of blasts from 2,715 lbs. of explosives reduced the 65,675-seat arena to rubble.

The City of Irving
Page 68

Texas’ Influence Rises at AIA

by: Stephen Sharpe

Two recent events have raised the national stature of the AIA’s Texas component, the state with the third-largest membership in the American Institute of Architects. In June, during the AIA convention in Miami, delegates elected Jeff Potter, FAIA, of Dallas as the 2011 first vice president/president-elect, which will evolve into the 2012 AIA presidency.

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The Collector

The Collector, a conceptual project by Brendan O’Grady, AIA, of RTKL Associates in Dallas, is a mixed-use development imagined for construction in Shanghai. Planned to encompass more than 2.7 million square feet, the project is “designed to harness the energy of business, culture, and nature.”

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Grauwyler Park Branch Library

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Oglesby Greene

In a famous Letter to the Editor in Architectural Record, architect Andres Duany labeled the four types of architectural consumers—patrons, clients, customers, and martyrs. Although he was writing in reference to housing, let’s (with apologies to Mr. Duany) apply the same categories to municipal architecture.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Kristin Winters, AIA
Page 40

Buzz Lofts

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: t. howard + associates/Parmadesign

Buzz Lofts, a live/work residential building designed by t. howard + associates, is sited on an urban block near downtown Dallas. Sustainable, modern, and artistic describe the design concept for the three-story building that rests above ground-floor parking.

Jay Brousseau
Page 83

AIA Dallas Selects Award Winners

by: Brian William Kuper, AIA

Two juries – one judging the built projects and another the unbuilt – for AIA Dallas’ 2010 Design Awards program presented 16 awards following deliberations in late September at the Dallas Center for Architecture. A total of 117 submittals, 74 built and 43 unbuilt, were entered by members of the local chapter.

Page 23

A Work in Progress

by: Kevin Sloan
Architect: Gromatzky Dupree & Associates

Park Lane is not your typical New Urbanist enclave. There is no tinge of nostalgia to the buildings, no sense of a walk down memory lane, nor the feel of a backdrop to a 1920s movie. Instead, crisp lines, angular building shapes, and modernist glass cubes are gathered along the familiar form of a street. Taken together, it is a project that manifests an interest in distinguishing urban design concepts from building style.

Steve Hinds Photography
Page 54

A Work in Progress

by: Kevin Sloan
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

Park Lane is not your typical New Urbanist enclave. There is no tinge of nostalgia to the buildings, no sense of a walk down memory lane, nor the feel of a backdrop to a 1920s movie. Instead, crisp lines, angular building shapes, and modernist glass cubes are gathered along the familiar form of a street. Taken together, it is a project that manifests an interest in distinguishing urban design concepts from building style.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA
Page 54

Studio Awards 2010


Architect: Max Levy, FAIA

Color Clock House was conceived as a speculative house for a developer of an enclave of sustainable homes in Dallas.

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Clyde Porter Receives AIA Young Award

by: Stephen Sharpe

For his efforts to encourage minority, under-served, and low-income students to pursue careers as architects, the American Institute of Architects’ Board of Directors has selected Clyde Porter, FAIA, as the 2009 recipient of the Whitney M. Young Jr. Award.

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Accessibility Exercise in Dallas Opens Eyes to New Perspective

by: Walter Kilroy, AIA

Have you ever wondered what it feels like to ask people in a restaurant to move from their seats so you can get to the handicapped seating area? Ever thought what a ramp looks like to a person in a wheelchair?

top and bottom right by Will Rutledge; bottom right photo courtesy F&S Partners
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A Resonant Ensemble

by: Willis Winters, FAIA
Architect: Allied Works Architecture; Booziotis & Company Architects

It is early afternoon at the new arts magnet school in downtown Dallas. Classes are in session and there is considerable activity in the building’s loft-like corridors. Students can be found working on class projects, but these are not the kinds of activities and assignments typically encountered in a high school curriculum.

Helene Binet; Jeremy Bittermann; Willis Winters, FAIA
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Building Careers

by: Tom Cox

The architecture CLUSTER at Skyline High School began in 1972 as one of the magnet career programs offered by the Dallas Independent School District to help prepare students for a variety of professions. From the outset, the objective was to provide students with the essential concepts of the practice of architecture.

Tom Cox
Page 96

Halprin’s Heritage Plaza in Fort Worth Among ‘Endangered’ Places for 2009

by: Michal g. Tincup, ASLA

Texas is gifted with many celebrated public landscapes from the modern era, including Philip Johnson’s Fort Worth Water Gardens (1974) and Thanks-Giving Square (1974); Daniel Kiley’s Fountain Place (1986) and Dallas Museum of Art (1983); and Peter Walker’s Nasher Sculpture Center Garden (2005).

Page 12

Trammell Crow (1914-2009)

by: Gregory Ibanez

The noted Dallas developer Trammell Crow passed away at his East Texas farm on Jan. 14. He was 94 years old and had apparently been in failing health for some time. While Crow’s reach in the commercial real estate world was international in scope, he left an inescapable legacy in his hometown of Dallas.

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Renewal of a Jewel

by: Duncan T. Fulton, AIA
Architect: ARCHITEXAS

he 16-story Dallas National Bank was a significant addition to Dallas’ burgeoning skyline in 1927. Its opening made headlines and its grandeur conveyed the prosperity and ambitions of both the young bank and the city around it. By the end of the century, however, its decrepit state and the indignities it had suffered also spoke volumes—not only about the building, but also about the state of Dallas’ urban core. Since then the fortunes of both have taken a happy turn for the better as exemplified in the building’s reincarnation as the Joule Hotel.

Eric Laignel, ARCHITEXAS
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Suburban Revival

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Omniplan

“Dallas is a place where the future looks better than the past,” states Ed Baum, the former dean of the University of Texas at Arlington’s School of Architecture and longtime Dallas resident. His description succinctly sums up both the regret of missed opportunities and the promise of better things to come. At the same time both sad and optimistic, his quip also captures the essence of the American city over the last 100 years or so—a place always expanding outward and leaving behind what came before, not just its downtown, but also its history. In short, the American city is forever searching for “a better future.” Dallas is a good example.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 64

EPA Extols Houston, D/FW for Efficiency

Houston and the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area are among the top five cities in the nation with the most buildings enrolled in the Energy Star program administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The federal program promotes energy conservation and reduction of greenhouse gases by designing buildings to be more energy efficient.

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Vision 2030: West Dallas Gateway

Recognized with a 2009 Great Places Award, co-sponsored by the Environmental Design Research Association and Metropolis magazine, the West Dallas Gateway suggests redevelopment strategies for a blighted, post-industrial area of the city.

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Dallas Convention Center Hotel

In March, demolition and soil remediation began on the future site of the Dallas Convention Center Hotel, designed by Dallas architectural firm 5Gstudio_collaborative with BOKA Powell as the architect of record.

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Designs on Volunteering

by: Margine Biswas

The opportunity to offer one’s knowledge and skills to young people can be an exceptionally rewarding experience. When such an opportunity arose recently, I joined several members of AIA Dallas’ Women in Architecture in preparing a presentation for middle school-aged girls to help them realize their potential for professional careers. Our presentation was part of the national “Expanding Your Horizons” program sponsored by the American Association of University Women.

Photo by Penny
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Forwarding Dallas

Designed by Portugal firms Atelier Data and MOOV, Forwarding Dallas is one of three winning projects in Urban Revision’s Re:Vision Dallas competition to design a fully sustainable 2.5-acre block in downtown Dallas.

Page 21

Suburban Revolution

by: Gregory Ibanez

During our now-passed housing boom, it certainly felt as though the appreciation of Modern residential design gained wider acceptance, as evidenced by the emergence of Dwell magazine and the resurgence of classic mid-century furniture. It has long been the architect’s lament that if consumers really had a choice, many would prefer contemporary, architect-designed homes instead of those ubiquitous builder McMansions. Two ambitious and important developments in Dallas, Kessler Woods and Urban Reserve, set out to prove this point.

Photo at left by Jason Franzen, ©2008 Buchanan Architecture; photo at right by James F. Wilson courtesy Talley Associates
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Neighbors

by: Stephen Fox

Architectural historian Virginia McAlester; architect and historian Willis Winters, FAIA; journalist Prudence Mackintosh; and photographer Steve Clicque have produced an extraordinary work on the history and architecture of Dallas’ two best-known twentieth-century residential communities, Highland Park and University Park.

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Urban Complex

by: Brian McLaren
Architect: JHP Architecture/Urban Design

Cityville Southwest Medical Center embodies the pioneer spirit. When opened in 2007, the mixed-use development shared the neighborhood with industrial brownfields, rusting steel warehouses, and a red-light district.

Steve Hinds; Stan Wolenski Photography
Page 46

Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas – New Family Center

by: Susan Butler
Architect: HDR Architecture

Located on the seventh floor of Baylor University Medical Center’s Truett Tower in Dallas, the New Family Center is a 22,000-sf renovation specializing in postpartum healthcare services.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 69

New Opera House and Theater Opens; Dallas Arts District Nears Completion

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

October 12 marks the long-awaited grand opening of the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts (DCPA), a multiple-venue complex located in the Dallas Arts District that includes a new opera house and outdoor performance park designed by Foster + Partners, a multiform theater designed by REX/OMA (Kendall/Heaton was the associate architect for both projects), and a 10-acre public park designed by the French landscape architect Michel Desvigne.

Photos by Willis Winters, FAIA
Page 22

Foster + Partners Exhibit at Nasher

by: Gregory Ibanez

The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas has shown a significant interest in architecture during its relatively brief history.

Page 25

San Antonio Military Medical Center

Construction of the 1.1 million-sf San Antonio Military Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston, designed by RTKL’s Dallas office, began in December. Scheduled for completion in July 2011, the $556 million integrated design-bid-build contract is a result of the 2005 Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission’s recommendations.

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