Article Results for "Dallas"

Neighbors

by: Stephen Fox

Architectural historian Virginia McAlester; architect and historian Willis Winters, FAIA; journalist Prudence Mackintosh; and photographer Steve Clicque have produced an extraordinary work on the history and architecture of Dallas’ two best-known twentieth-century residential communities, Highland Park and University Park.

Page 31

Urban Complex

by: Brian McLaren
Architect: JHP Architecture/Urban Design

Cityville Southwest Medical Center embodies the pioneer spirit. When opened in 2007, the mixed-use development shared the neighborhood with industrial brownfields, rusting steel warehouses, and a red-light district.

Steve Hinds; Stan Wolenski Photography
Page 46

Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas – New Family Center

by: Susan Butler
Architect: HDR Architecture

Located on the seventh floor of Baylor University Medical Center’s Truett Tower in Dallas, the New Family Center is a 22,000-sf renovation specializing in postpartum healthcare services.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 69

New Opera House and Theater Opens; Dallas Arts District Nears Completion

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

October 12 marks the long-awaited grand opening of the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts (DCPA), a multiple-venue complex located in the Dallas Arts District that includes a new opera house and outdoor performance park designed by Foster + Partners, a multiform theater designed by REX/OMA (Kendall/Heaton was the associate architect for both projects), and a 10-acre public park designed by the French landscape architect Michel Desvigne.

Photos by Willis Winters, FAIA
Page 22

Foster + Partners Exhibit at Nasher

by: Gregory Ibanez

The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas has shown a significant interest in architecture during its relatively brief history.

Page 25

San Antonio Military Medical Center

Construction of the 1.1 million-sf San Antonio Military Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston, designed by RTKL’s Dallas office, began in December. Scheduled for completion in July 2011, the $556 million integrated design-bid-build contract is a result of the 2005 Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission’s recommendations.

Page 28

Illustrious Memorial

by: Julien Meyrat

According to Jack Craycroft, AIA, the idea for an architectural delineation competition and exhibit was partly inspired by the numerous architectural renderings that his firm, Craycroft-Lacy & Partners, produced as a means of selling projects to clients and financial lenders.

Illustration courtesy Ken Roberts Memorial Delineation Competition
Page 37

Terminal Clarity

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Corgan with HKS and HNTB

Discussing Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Terminal D and its selection for a 2009 TSA Design Award, juror Philip Freelon, FAIA, said, “We thought that the project was a very good example of a public building, very prominent, but it still was handled with quite some sensitivity. We all have been in airports, probably more than we’d like, and this is one where you actually feel a sense of light and airy space, which is relaxing. Natural light was well used, and the high volume of the space gives it an open and comfortable feeling. We thought it was well worthy of an award.”

Craig Blackmon, FAIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 44

A Sonnet to Dwell In

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

The area just north of downtown Dallas known as Oak Lawn is rich and diverse in demographics, land use, and building types. Having matured over time, Oak Lawn has evolved into a neighborhood of restaurants, churches, hotels, offices, and a varied assemblage of residential buildings.

Jason Franzen; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 48

Garden Spot

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Cunningham Architects

From the street Cunningham Architects’ House in the Garden is a beautifully conceived and executed object, partially shielded behind an iconic wall constructed of stainless-steel wire grid and filled with fragments of slag glass. This idealized garden villa – really a giant porch – provides a delightful way to both view and inhabit a highly personalized landscape. It’s a thoughtful and well organized bit of place making; surprisingly its greatest success is as a foil and extension of an outdoor space that was originally part of the adjacent house.

James F. Wilson, Gisela Borghi; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 52

Haven for Art

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Laguarda Low Architects

Once just another nondescript, single-story building indistinguishable from its neighbors that together comprise a light-industrial district wedged between downtown Dallas and the Trinity River, the Light & Sie Art Gallery now stands out. The reconfigured entry, framed by a box of aluminum panels, asserts a refined presence that quietly commands attention amid the clutter of storefronts along Leslie Street on the city’s near-west side. The 13,000-sf project is one of the latest examples in a transformative trend for the area where a few of the shopworn buildings have been repurposed as showrooms for the design trade and retail galleries for contemporary art.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 60

Catalyst for Creativity

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: HKS

The comprehensive renovation of a circa-1970 Brutalist office building has yielded a comfortable and award-winning home for the innovate research being conducted by the University of Texas at Dallas Center for BrainHealth. Designed by HKS, with Kyley Harvey leading the effort, the 63,000-sf project was completed in late 2006.

Blake Marvin/HKS; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 80

Light Show

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Booziotis & Company, Thomas Phifer & Partners, nodesign

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 96

AIA Dallas Celebrates Design Excellence

The Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architects announced the 2007 design award winners during its annual Design Awards Announcement and Celebration Party in the AT&T Victory Plaza on Sept. 19, 2007.

Page 20

Interloop’s E-X-I-T Enters MoMA

On Nov. 7, 2007, the Museum of Modern Art in New York inducted into its permanent collection Interloop Architecture’s E-X-I-T sign custom designed for the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. Fabricated with acrylic letters and illuminated by LED, the Houston firm’s creation joins other works in the MoMA Architecture and Design collection suchas Vignelli’s New York subway signage and the Flight Departure Panel from Solari di Udine.

Page 24

Trinity River Corridor Approved (Again)

by: Duncan T Fulton, FAIA

On Nov. 6, Dallas voters endorsed development of the Trinity River Corridor in general, and local government’s specific vision in particular. This was the second time in 10 years the electorate had been called to the polls on the issue. The first occurred in 1998 when the voters approved a $246 million bond issue for development of the corridor. The second election was a referendum challenging specific aspects of how the plan had developed since 1998.

Page 24

Jubilee Community Center

Planned in conjunction with a community resource center, the Jubilee Community Center is designed by brownarchitects of Dallas in collaboration with the Detroit Collaborative Design Center, a nonprofit that helped organize meetings with nearby residents.

Page 26

Anfield Stadium

When the Liverpool Football Club decided to expand its Anfield Stadium in Stanley Park, the British soccer club hired Dallas-based architect HKS to design the 60,000-seat sports arena.

Page 26

A Beauty with Brains

by: Nestor Ifanzon
Architect: Page Southerland Page, LLP

The new Natural Science and Engineering Research Laboratory at the University of Texas at Dallas creates an innovative scientific environment while simultaneously possessing an astonishing architectural presence. The design and construction of the four-story, 192,000-squarefoot research facility responds to UT Dallas’ strategic plan to establish a top-flight research institution that will serve as a catalyst for interdisciplinary research. University officials expect to fill the facility with high-level faculty and scientists from such disparate fields as electrical engineering, materials science and engineering, chemistry, biology, and behavioral and brain sciences.

Robert Canfield
Page 32

LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex

by: Megan Braley
Architect: PBK Architects

The 120,792-square-foot LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex, located in the Denton Independent School District, includes 16 academies that provide students with trade-specific technical skills. PBK Architects of Dallas has uniquely designed each academy to reflect a specific professional working environment that facilitates increased learning through experience.

Jud Haggard
Page 65

All Aboard!

by: Stephen Sharpe

Commuter rail is returning to Austin, bringing with it several transit oriented developments (TOD) that will drive the creation of new live/work/play neighborhoods centered around at least eight train stations. Perhaps as early as this fall, Austin will join Dallas and Houston in reviving urban rail travel as a means to reduce traffic congestion and as a catalyst for thoughtful intracity planning. That means more people in and around Austin will have the option of leaving their cars at home.

map courtesy City of Austin Neighborhood Planning & Zoning Department; rendering courtesy MWM Design Group
Page 5

Winner Selected for Dallas Center for Architecture Competition

by: W. Mark Gunderson, AIA

AIA Dallas, following examples from across the country (New York City and Houston considered obvious prologue) has taken the first steps towards the construction of a new 7,500-square foot venue intended to house its own activities as well as those of multiple organizations aligned with the architectural mission of the chapter including the Dallas Architectural Foundation and the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Rendering courtesy Peter Doncaster, AIA
Page 14

Bygone Big D

by: James Pratt

Mark Rice is as fascinated with downtown Dallas history as I am. As a boy of four, I first saw big downtown buildings when I was brought across the Houston Street bridge, then Highway 80, from Fort Worth. A couple of years later, I saw the new winged red horse installed on the top of the Magnolia Petroleum Company headquarters.

Page 22

A City’s Vision Becomes Reality

by: Stephen Sharpe

As reported on the following pages, One Arts Plaza represents the first major commercial venture to open for some time in the Dallas Arts District. Construction continues to swirl around the new project, designed by Morrison Seifert Murphy, as crews work on several significant buildings immediately adjacent to its site. One Arts Plaza, shown at the far left in the rendering provided by the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts, is set at the northeast end of Flora Street that bisects the Arts District. At the street’s other terminus is the Dallas Museum of Art, which, since the Edward Larrabee Barnes-designed complex opened in 1984, has been joined by neighboring cultural venues designed by other highly renowned architects.

Winspear Opera House and Annette Strauss Artist Square Renderings courtesy Foster + Partners; Wyly Theatre And Performance Park Renderings Courtesy Luxigon; Dallas Arts District Rendering Courtesy Dallas Center for the Performing Arts
Page 24

Homage to the Square

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Morrison Seifert Murphy; Corgan Associates

Anchoring the eastern edge of downtown Dallas , One Arts Plaza is a defining presence as the tallest building in the expanding Dallas Arts District. As difficult as it is for any single building to define an edge, this outwardly restrained building could be seen as a textbook lesson on how a tall building, handled skillfully, can contribute to the urban fabric. At this moment, while construction just now begins on significant cultural landmarks but before those adjacent projects grab all the attention within the Arts District, the 24-story One Arts Plaza cannot be missed.

Charles Smith, AIA
Page 26

Justice Served

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Rees Associates, Inc.

The addition to and renovation of the George Allen Sr. courthouse consolidates all 45 of the Dallas County civil courts, formerly located in three buildings, into one central location. Providing 210,000 square feet of new space, the addition stacks its program with the highest traffic family court spaces on the bottom, served by escalators.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 66

‘Horizons’ Program Introduces Girls To Future Professional Opportunities

by: Margine Biswas

For the past eight years, AIA Dallas’ Women in Architecture has reached out to girls in elementary and middle-school grades through a national program called Expanding Your Horizons. The program encourages girls to continue their studies in math and science by introducing them to interesting career options in technical subjects.

photo by Penny Ball
Page 14

Four by 4

Nocturnal: Design Lab of Dallas describes its Four by 4 as a suburban tree house. It was selected by Lauritzen Gardens, Omaha’s Botanical Center, as a winner in the 2008 KidStructure Competition. Four by 4 is intended to inspire creative play among the young and the young-at-heart. The exterior is composed of a series of 4x4-inch pressure-treated timbers of various lengths.

Page 23

First Step to a New Campus

by: Ann Christensen
Architect: FKP Architects in association with John Lee, FAIA

People come to healthcare facilities to be healed , so it is reasonable for them to expect treatment based on the latest research and technology that will aid their recovery. Patients also might expect that facility to be an environment designed not only to prevent ill health but to promote a healthy lifestyle.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 46

Statler Hilton Listed as ‘Endangered’

When first opened in 1956, the sheer size and bold form made the Statler Hilton one of downtown Dallas’ crown jewels. Fifty-two years later, the former icon of mid-century design sits vacant and threatened by encroaching development. However, with its recent inclusion on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s 2008 list of 11 Most Endangered Places, the old hotel may survive the increasing pressure for its destruction.

Hilton Photo Copyright John Rogers Photography, courtesy Kate Singleton
Page 12

Cloepfil Addresses Dallas Forum On Booker T. Washington School

by: Michael Malone

As part of the events celebrating the opening of the Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, the Dallas Architectural Foundation invited Brad Cloepfil to speak about his firm’s project located in the Dallas Arts District. Cloepil, principal of Allied Works in Portland, Ore., presented the lecture on June 6 at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Photos by Jeremy Bittermann, courtesy Allied Works Architecture
Page 16

TSA Medal for Lifetime Achievement

Velpeau (Vel) E. Hawes Jr., FAIA, graduated in 1958 with a bachelor of architecture degree from Texas A&M University in College Station. After four years of service as an infantry officer, he began a 38-year career as a licensed architect and licensed interior designer with several architectural firms in Dallas, including Omniplan, HOK, and PGAL.

Page 14

DMA Exhibits Work by UTA Studios

by: Susan Appleton, Brad Bell

Planes of sewing thread, a panel of drinking straws, pillows of concrete, and 3-D tiles of laser cut paper – materials used out of context to challenge ordinary associations – form the basis of two walls created by students at UT Arlington’s School of Architecture for the inaugural exhibition in the Center for Creative Connections at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Top left photo by Marta Sw aff er; all others courtesy Dallas Museum of Art
Page 22

West 7th Street District

Centered in the heart of Fort Worth’s Museum and Cultural District, an exciting new urban redevelopment has been designed by Good Fulton & Farrell Architects of Dallas. Spanning five city blocks, 900,000 square feet, and conveniently situated across University Drive from The Modern Art Museum, the mixed-use complex is projected to re-establish the West 7th Street area as a thriving entertainment and shopping district.

Page 29

Helix Pedestrian Bridge

The globally acclaimed architectural firm RTKL Associates, of Dallas has designed a pedestrian bridge in Macao, China, called The Helix. Inspired by the cultural intersections of technology and nature, the 161 meter curvilinear footbridge stands 11 meters over a developing tropical garden and water park, connecting two shopping malls within a large mixed-use entertainment superstructure.

Page 29

George Allen Sr. Courthouse

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Rees Associates

The addition to and renovation of the George Allen Sr. Courthouse building consolidates all 45 of the Dallas County civil courts, formerly located in three buildings, into one central location. Providing 210,000 square feet of new pace, the addition stacks its program with the highest traffic family court spaces on the bottom, served by escalators.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 62

Oak Court

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

Few architects’ legacies have been more controversial than that of mid-century modernist Edward Durrell Stone. As his buildings age, they don’t engender the passion for restoration often associated with the work of his peers. Buchanan Architecture’s recent restoration and remodel of Oak Court – a palatial Stone design in Dallas from 1956 – offers a clear signal that, despite any prejudices, there is value in Stone’s buildings.

James F. Wilson
Page 82

The Shore

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: WDG Architecture Dallas

Located adjacent to Lady Bird Lake in Austin’s developing 27-acre Waterfront District, The Shore is a 22-story residential complex combining the luxury of lakeside living with the convenience of downtown accessibility. Designed for High Street Residential, a subsidiary of Dallas-based Trammell Crow Company, the complex sits within walking distance of the public hike and bike trail, Sixth Street’s nightlife, and the central business district.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 111

High Expectations

by: Joyce Chandran

When architects from Leo A Daly’s Dallas office and engineers from its sister company, Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam in Houston, were tasked with designing a transportation facility for the Houston Independent School District, all parties concluded that it was an opportunity to set a new standard in industrial building design.

Page 144

AIA Dallas Presents Design Awards

by: AIA Dallas Staff

Ten local architectural firms, plus a student design studio from the University of Texas at Arlington, earned top honors Sept. 18 at AIA Dallas’ 2008 Design Awards presented in an open-air ceremony on AT&T Plaza at Victory Park.

Page 16

Open Window to History

by: Jonathan Moore

Almost 20 years ago, an infamous building in downtown Dallas reopened as a museum dedicated to the history of events surrounding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza replicates the time and place where a sniper took aim at half-past noon on Nov. 22, 1963. Through the combined efforts of architects, civic leaders, preservation historians, and many volunteers, the museum allows 325,000 visitors annually to experience the building as it existed when JFK’s motorcade passed by 45 years ago.

Depository photo by Bret St. Clair, courtesy The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza;
Motorcad e photo by Walt Sisco, courtesy The Dallas Morning News
Page 22

Audubon Takes Flight

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: BRW Architects in association with Antoine Predock Architect

Just eight miles southeast of downtown Dallas, another world exists far removed from the city’s shimmering high-rises and labyrinthine expressways. This world is known as the Great Trinity Forest, the largest urban bottomland hardwood forest in North America. Its 6,000 acres support a widely diverse community of plants and animals that thrives in this unique ecosystem where three distinct biomes – timberland, wetlands, and prairie – converge.

Michael Lyon
Page 34

International on Turtle Creek

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

The 250,000-square-foot International Harvester parts warehouse, located in the Old Trinity Industrial District near downtown Dallas, was originally constructed in 1948 and recently redesigned by local architecture firm Good Fulton & Farrell. Focused on contributing to the growth of Dallas’ Design District, the firm divided the warehouse into smaller units ranging from 1,549 square feet to 39,637 square feet, intended to house an assortment of furniture and interior design showrooms. The architects transformed the site by carving out an open-air corridor through the middle of the building.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 64

Dallas Cowboys’ Stadium

The concept for the 2.3 million-sf sports venue in Arlington features a monumental pair of boxed arches that will support the largest retractable roof of its kind in the world. The stadium, designed by HKS Architects, is scheduled to open in 2009.

Page 19

New Dallas Schools

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

The Texas schoolhouse is evolving into something new and different at the beginning of the twenty-first century as the state’s burgeoning growth has fueled an intense building campaign.

Page 24

Shared Resources

by: Michael Malone
Architect: VAI Architects

Within the re-emergent Oak Cliff neighborhood on Dallas’ south side, the new Arcadia Park Elementary School and Branch Library demonstrates how civic buildings can focus the life of a community around an institution. Designed by Dallas-based VAI Architects and located in a stunning site with elevated views towards downtown Dallas, the complex spreads out along a continuous linear spine that provides circulation between classroom wings and shared common amenities.

Miguel Casanova
Page 26

Walker Creek Elementary

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: HKS Architects

Located in the North Richland Hills area of Dallas, Walker Creek Elementary embraces a new school design concept that integrates surrounding residential and urban environments. Built on 10.5 acres bordered by Parker, Simmons, and Bridge streets, the school serves 680 students in pre-kindergarten through fifth grade.

Blake Marvin
Page 53

Northeast Texas 2006 Design Awards

by: Brett Patrick, AIA

Seven projects were recognized at the Northeast Texas AIA annual Christmas party and chapter meeting. The jury panel consisted of Kenneth Apel, AIA, of HKS in Dallas; Gary Kirchoff, AIA, of HH Architects in Dallas; and Andrew Vernooy, AIA, dean of the Texas Tech School of Architecture

Page 15

Homeless Assistance Center

Sanctuary, light, and sustainability are the key themes of the design for the City of Dallas’ Homeless Assistance Center to be located on a three-acre downtown site. CamargoCopeland and Overland Partners are working together as the architects.

Page 21

Metal Takes Flight

by: Toy Henson
Architect: GRW Willis, Inc.

WITH traffic at Love Field and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport at all-time highs, Dallas’ business air travelers are finding an alternative to long lines and delays in the form of a renovated and expanded Dallas Executive Airport, formerly known as Redbird Airport.

Scott Womack
Page 58
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