Article Results for "FAIA"

Portrait of a Richly Layered City

by: R. Lawrence Good, FAIA

Hosting the national convention of the American Institute of Architects brings to the local AIA chapter an unwritten responsibility to continue the long string of guidebooks to the architecture of the host cities. Not since 1986 had San Antonio hosted the national convention, and prepared a comprehensive guide to its built environment.

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Faithful Addition

by: Duncan T Fulton, FAIA
Architect: ARCHITEXAS

In the mid-1990s, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Dallas settled on a simple, but audacious goal: To commemorate the 100th anniversary of its cathedral by finally completing the building as originally designed by one of Texas’ most significant architects. The result is testament to both the power of the original work and the talent of those responsible for the remarkable addition that ensued.

Carolyn Brown
Page 28

Starting Point

by: Nestor Ifanzon, FAIA
Architect: Gromatzky Dupree & Associates

The journey that began centuries ago finds a rest stop within the urban fabric of North Dallas with the new Akiba Yavneh Academy, a private pre-K-12 school that caters to the city’s Modern Orthodox Jewish community. Built as the legacy of the Schultz and Rosenberg families, the academy’s 8.5-acre campus is envisioned as a metaphorical bridge connecting “that which is sacred” and “that which belongs to everyday life.”

Charles Kendrick & Co.
Page 32

AIA’s Kemper Award Honors Tittle

James D. Tittle, FAIA, of the Tittle Luther Partnership in Abilene is the 2006 recipient of the Kemper Award for Service to the Profession. The Kemper Award, named in memory of the national AIA’s first executive director, recognizes individuals who contribute significantly to the profession of architecture through service to the AIA.

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Predock to Receive AIA Gold Medal

Antoine Predock, FAIA, will be presented the 2006 AIA Gold Medal, the highest honor conferred by AIA, at the American Architectural Foundation Accent on Architecture Gala. The event will be held on Feb. 10 at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. The medal, bestowed annually, honors an individual whose significant body of work has had a lasting influence on the theory and practice of architecture.

Courtesy Brown Reynolds Watford Architects; Courtesy Antoine Predock Architect
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AIA LRGV Presents Design Awards

Four projects received Honor Awards in AIA LRGV’s 2005 Design Awards competition, held on Sept. 15 during the TSA annual convention. The jury—Val Glitsch, FAIA, of Val Glitsch FAIA Architect; Stephen Sharpe, editor of Texas Architect; and Mark Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen selected the award recipients from 17 entries.

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Three Projects Take El Paso Awards

Three projects received awards in AIA El Paso’s 2005 Design Awards ceremony on Oct. 27. The projects were reviewed by a panel of eight jurors, all staff members of the New York City firm of Holzman Moss Architecture— Malcolm Holzman, FAIA; Michael Connolly; Steve Benesh; Jose Reyes, AIA; Chiun Ng; Lyna Vuong; Matt Kirschner; and Curtis Pittman.

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The Brick Wanted to Dance

by: Anna Mod
Architect: RoTo Architects with HKS

“The brick said it wanted to dance,” exclaims Michael Rotondi, FAIA, when asked about the veneer on the new Art and Architecture Building at Prairie View A&M University. Designed by Rotondi’s firm, RoTo Architects in Los Angeles, the 105,000-sf complex adds a dramatic presence to this rural campus located 50 miles west of Houston.

Assassi Productions
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Six Texans Elevated to AIA Fellows

Six Texans, along with 76 other architects around the nation, were elected AIA Fellows by the 2006 Jury of Fellows on Feb. 1. From a membership of more than 75,000, the AIA has fewer than 2,500 members distinguished in fellowship, which requires at least 10 years of membership and significant architectural contributions on a national level.

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The Grace and Disgrace of Weathering

by: Max Levy, FAIA

Drive between any two Texas cities and you’ll be surprised at what often emerges as the most engaging building alongside the highway. It likely won’t be the truck stop or the fast-food franchise or the awkwardly expressive church. More often than not, the most affecting building will be some rural ruin, a farmhouse or a barn or an equipment shed, marooned out in a field, long abandoned, and weather-scoured.

Max Levy, FAIA
Page 20

Renaissance for Dallas Parks

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

The “evil” to which Jackson referred in his 1979 essay concerns the changing public perception of municipal parks. Jackson, our era’s eminent observer of the American landscape, was lamenting the fact that city parks were no longer viewed as neighborhood assets. As he observed in his essay, the nation’s city parks attained their ultimate prominence in the early twentieth century as attributes of a community’s economic health and vitality. However, less than a hundred years later, public perception had fallen to the point where they were seen as unsightly liabilities to neighborhood security.

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Whimsical Volumes

by: Jon Thompson
Architect: Sprinkle Robey Architects

Architecture in San Antonio was once identified by a palette of materials and colors established by O’Neil Ford based on his appreciation of regional building traditions. Responding to the modernist ethos that demanded an honest expression of materials, this “natural” palette combined Central Texas limestone, a standing-seam metal roof, and wood with the grain stained rather than hidden under a coat of paint. Then, in 1995, came the San Antonio Central Library designed by Ricardo Legorreta, FAIA.

Paul Hester
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Woodall Rodgers Park Planned as Literal Bridge for Urban Dallas

by: Duncan T Fulton, FAIA

Fueled by a vision that is as compelling as it is bold, Woodall Rodgers Park has quickly emerged as one of the most significant – and popular – initiatives in Dallas’ urban core.

Illustrations by Jim Arp for The Office of James Burnett
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AIA West Texas Awards Five Projects

Five projects received awards in AIA West Texas’s 2006 Design Awards. The projects were reviewed by a panel three jurors—Ray Bailey, FAIA, of Bailey Architects; Rick Archer, FAIA, of Overland Partners; and Dan Shipley, FAIA, of Shipley Architects.

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