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AIA San Antonio Presents Design Awards

by: AIA San Antonio Staff

After jurors carefully evaluated 53 entries from 20 local architectural firms and one individual AIA member, the AIA San Antonio chapter announced the winners of its 2008 Design Awards. A total of 13 projects were recognized with awards in early November. Kell Muñoz topped the list with five awards.

Page 18

All Architecture, All the Time

by: Eagon Gleason

In the lab, we students are gathered in a tight group around Philip Johnson listening while he tells us of his recent visit to Taliesin West for a meeting with Frank Lloyd Wright. It’s almost as if we are walking with him as he describes in vivid detail his approach to the compound and begins making his way through the masterfully orchestrated series of rooms and passages; we take each turn with him, see each vista, revel at every ray of light, and feel in our viscera every quickening, every slowing through space and time.

Egan Gleason
Page 28

Direct from Bhutan

While some architects look askance at the seemingly strange importation of a foreign style onto the UTEP campus, the Bhutanese apparently are pleased that their architectural idiom has been incorporated into modern American buildings.

Temple Photo courtesy UTE P.
Page 39

A Resonant Ensemble

by: Willis Winters, FAIA
Architect: Allied Works Architecture; Booziotis & Company Architects

It is early afternoon at the new arts magnet school in downtown Dallas. Classes are in session and there is considerable activity in the building’s loft-like corridors. Students can be found working on class projects, but these are not the kinds of activities and assignments typically encountered in a high school curriculum.

Helene Binet; Jeremy Bittermann; Willis Winters, FAIA
Page 40

A Well-Centered Campus

by: Thomas M. Colbert, A IA
Architect: Thomas Phifer and Partners

Located near the geographic center of Houston’s frenetic urbanism, just below the crosshairs of its freeway system, the Rice University campus harbors an almost monastic quiet and tranquility. Rice, with a lot more land per student than at most urban universities, affords quite a bit of distance between students as they wander between the staid allees of shade trees and colonnaded brick buildings.

Scott Francis
Page 46

Mexican Modern In East Austin

by: Mario L. Sanchez, PhD
Architect: Cotera+Reed Architects

Founded in 1987, Southwest Key Programs, a national non-profit group based in Austin, manages a variety of social programs to benefit disadvantaged youth and their families. Intending for its new headquarters to act as a tool for neighborhood revitalization, the organization selected a site in a traditionally under-served area of the city to locate the Southwest Key East Austin Community Development Project.

Mike Osborne
Page 52

Homework Yields High Marks

by: Chris Schultz, AIA
Architect: Pfluger Associates Architects; Chumney & Associates

The North East Independent School District set several lofty learning objectives for the designers of its new prototypical middle school, José M. Lopez Middle School, in the fast-growing Stone Oak area of far-north San Antonio.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 58

Andy Dekaney High School

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Andy Dekaney High School recently received the 2008 Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture. Based on findings that students perform better in small groups, “Instruction Should Drive Construction” was the guiding philosophy for SH W Group’s design of the 486,000-square-foothigh school sited on 80.7 acres in Houston’s Spring Independent School District.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 69

Waxahachie Global High School

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Huckabee & Associates

Waxahachie Global High School received the 2008 TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture “Special Recognition for Outstanding School Renovation.” Huckabee and Associates restored the three-story, 1917 T.C. Wilemon building, transforming the 79,356-square-foot space into a high-tech campus equipped with the latest technology.

Paul Chaplo
Page 72

Neglected Territory

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA

Ignored by many architects and most academics, tilt wall construction is nonetheless widespread. It is prevalent in the marketplace and ubiquitous on the landscape, yet tilt wall construction is considered a “low” form of building methodology utilized in commercial construction by “mainstream” architects and their co-conspirators in the building trades. As a result, tilt wall construction has been overlooked as an area for more extensive architectural exploration.

K.J. McNitt photo courtesy Elliott + Associates Architect s; TXU customer service center Photo Courtesy cunningham architect s
Page 74

Building Careers

by: Tom Cox

The architecture CLUSTER at Skyline High School began in 1972 as one of the magnet career programs offered by the Dallas Independent School District to help prepare students for a variety of professions. From the outset, the objective was to provide students with the essential concepts of the practice of architecture.

Tom Cox
Page 96

Halprin’s Heritage Plaza in Fort Worth Among ‘Endangered’ Places for 2009

by: Michal g. Tincup, ASLA

Texas is gifted with many celebrated public landscapes from the modern era, including Philip Johnson’s Fort Worth Water Gardens (1974) and Thanks-Giving Square (1974); Daniel Kiley’s Fountain Place (1986) and Dallas Museum of Art (1983); and Peter Walker’s Nasher Sculpture Center Garden (2005).

Page 12

Trammell Crow (1914-2009)

by: Gregory Ibanez

The noted Dallas developer Trammell Crow passed away at his East Texas farm on Jan. 14. He was 94 years old and had apparently been in failing health for some time. While Crow’s reach in the commercial real estate world was international in scope, he left an inescapable legacy in his hometown of Dallas.

Page 16

Outlook for a Downturn

by: Stephen Sharpe

Just how troublesome are current economic conditions in Texas? To gain insight, Texas Architect invited six architects to join a roundtable discussion where they were asked to assess their local markets and offer near-term forecasts. The roundtable discussion took place in Austin on Jan. 19.

Julie Pizzo; original photography by istock and shutterstock
Page 30

Campus Conversion

by: Kurt Neubek, FAIA and John Clegg, AIA
Architect: HarrisonKornberg Architects

The Houston Community College (HCC) System is one of the nation’s largest, with 23 locations across the metropolitan area. Since its creation in 1971, the system has acquired a diverse range of facilities and adapted them for educational purposes.

Michael Stravato
Page 52

Landmark Encore

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Marquis Group

Montgomery Ward published its first catalogue in 1872 and soon found great success shipping farm equipment and other goods across the U.S. via rail. In the 1920s the company built nine regional facilities that combined distribution centers and retail outlets, including one in Fort Worth in 1928. The eight-story Mission Revival building, completed in nine months by general contractor Thos. S. Byrne, was expanded and renovated several times over the years. Enclosing 600,000 square feet, the U-shaped edifice teemed with fervent activity through the 1960s.

Craig Smith
Page 58

Hyatt Lost Pines Resort

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: HKS Hill Glazier Studio

Page 72

Survey: Texas Slow to Adopt BIM

by: Andy MacPhillimy, AIA

The software capabilities that are the foundation for Building Information Modeling, or BIM, have been under development for more than 20 years, and in the last few years awareness and interest in BIM by the AEC industry have grown remarkably. However, a recent survey indicates that the AEC industry in Texas has been slow to adopt BIM. Those few in Texas who are now using BIM, survey respondents state that adoption of the new technology has resulted in wide-ranging changes in the way they design and deliver projects.

Page 74

Adapt, Transform, Forget…

by: Fernando Brave

The modernist dictum that “form follows function” does not appear a viable equation in adaptive re-use where function must follow form. Take, for example, the re-purposing of the ubiquitous and increasingly unappealing big box. Texas Architect asked a group of artists and designers to do just that, to consider the fate of a vacant Circuit City building. Their responses are diverse, and can be grouped into three distinct categories—adapted, transformed, and forgotten.

Page 84

EPA Extols Houston, D/FW for Efficiency

Houston and the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area are among the top five cities in the nation with the most buildings enrolled in the Energy Star program administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The federal program promotes energy conservation and reduction of greenhouse gases by designing buildings to be more energy efficient.

Page 10

AIA Awards Texas Housing Projects

Two projects by Texas firms are among the 17 residential buildings recognized in the 2009 AIA Housing Awards. The awards program, now in its ninth year, was established to recognize the best in housing design and promote the importance of good housing as a necessity of life, a sanctuary for the human spirit, and a valuable national resource.

Photos by (left) Hester & Hardaway and (right) Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 12

SAC Program Celebrates Milestone

by: Julie Cooper

In 1958, architect Vernon Helmke inaugurated a program at San Antonio College to prepare students for careers in architecture. Since offering those first classes in design, graphics, freehand drawing, and construction, SAC’s architectural curriculum has grown in size and reputation.

Photos courtesy San Antonio College
Page 14

TSA Design Awards Jury Selected

by: TA Staff

Three highly respected designers will judge the entries in the 2009 TSA Design Awards program. The jurors will be Philip Freelon, FAIA, president of the Freelon Group in Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, president of San Francisco-based landscape architecture firm Hargreaves Associates; and Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects in Tucson. The jury is set to meet May 15 in Austin.

Page 17

Vision 2030: West Dallas Gateway

Recognized with a 2009 Great Places Award, co-sponsored by the Environmental Design Research Association and Metropolis magazine, the West Dallas Gateway suggests redevelopment strategies for a blighted, post-industrial area of the city.

Page 22

Designs on Volunteering

by: Margine Biswas

The opportunity to offer one’s knowledge and skills to young people can be an exceptionally rewarding experience. When such an opportunity arose recently, I joined several members of AIA Dallas’ Women in Architecture in preparing a presentation for middle school-aged girls to help them realize their potential for professional careers. Our presentation was part of the national “Expanding Your Horizons” program sponsored by the American Association of University Women.

Photo by Penny
Page 25

Language in the Landscape

by: Daniel Olsen

The rural Southwest provides a place for landscape to wordlessly tell stories, reveal history, and offer solace. A few hours spent “listening” to this landscape reminds us that our spoken and written languages are human constructs.

Page 28

Art in the Park

by: PageSoutherlandPage
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

In early 2004, a group of prominent local philanthropists negotiated a landmark deal with Houston Mayor Bill White. As outlined in the pact, the City of Houston contributed several downtown parcels in front of the George R. Brown Convention Center and the philanthropists agreed to fund the design and maintenance of a world-class park that promised to breathe new life into the urban core. Named through a public competition, the non-profit Discovery Green Conservancy opened the $122 million park in April 2008 to widespread acclaim. The 11.8-acre urban amenity is located near the southeast edge of downtown, between the Toyota Center basketball arena and Minute Maid Park baseball stadium.

Eric Laignel Photography; Chris Cooper Photography; Julie Pizzo
Page 44

Art at Discovery Green

The designers of Discovery Green incorporated art installations throughout the park, including interactive pieces that invite visitors to have a little fun. Great care was taken to ensure the installations would be visually prominent yet nestled within the park’s environs. Many of the works are by well-known artists, including Doug Hollis, whose Mist Tree (shown at left) is the latest of his water-jet sculptures designed for outdoor spaces around the U.S. His large interactive Gateway Fountain (at right) entices children to cool down from the heat.

Page 48

The Park on Barton Creek

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Merriman Associates/Architects

The Park on Barton Creek combines corporate office functionality with the natural setting of the South Austin greenbelt. Designed by Merriman Associates/Architects, the project features two five-story, 100,000-squarefoot buildings set along the western edge of the site to minimize impact to the heavily wooded Barton Creek.

Squire Haskins Photography
Page 62

Acme Brick Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Gideon Toal

Acme Brick established two goals with the design of their new headquarters—to respond to the wooded site, setting a standard for future development in the area, and to demonstrate the variety of design alternatives that can be achieved with brick veneer.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA; Steven Vaughan
Photography, Dallas
Page 64

Survival in Challenging Times

by: Jim Atkins, FAIA and Grant A. Simpson, FAIA

Here we go again; another recession. And since the work of the design professional is directly related to the economy, our livelihood thrives or suffers accordingly. Those good times that seemed as though they would never end seem to have ended, at least for the present. Projects have gone on hold, or away, friends have been laid off, and many employees are now wanting for something meaningful to do.

Photo illustrations by Julie Pizzo; sketch courtesy merr iman associates/architects
Page 68

The Stuff of Dreams

Amongst the challenges and tribulations of the day, we are compelled to make one parting comment about young people in architecture and their future.

Page 69

Inside-Out Studio

by: Brian Dougan

During the Spring 2007 semester, behind an anonymous tract house on a culdesac in suburban College Station, I designed and built an inside-out studio where I produce utilitarian and often highly decorated earthenware.

images courtesy brian dougan
Page 76

Archives of the Episcopal Church

The Archives of the Episcopal Church, designed by Studio 8 Architects of Austin, is a five-story, 70,000-sf building that will be the new home for the church’s national archives, which are currently housed in a late-1950s campus as part of the Southwest Episcopal Seminary

Page 21

Building in ‘Enough’

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Nonya Grenader, FAIA

The site for the house Nonya Grenader, FAIA, designed for her family in Houston was selected for the beauty of the existing trees and shade and its ideal proximity as a construction site. Intimately acquainted with the amenities of the Southampton neighborhood, a deed-restricted subdivision near Rice, the Grenaders had lived next door for 11 years before their elderly neighbor offered to sell them her house in 1997. The 55x130-foot lot presented an opportunity to create a new environment tailored to their long-established live/work lifestyle.

Nash Baker Photographer
Page 34

Urban Complex

by: Brian McLaren
Architect: JHP Architecture/Urban Design

Cityville Southwest Medical Center embodies the pioneer spirit. When opened in 2007, the mixed-use development shared the neighborhood with industrial brownfields, rusting steel warehouses, and a red-light district.

Steve Hinds; Stan Wolenski Photography
Page 46

Canyon Village

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Alejandro Aravena; Cotera+Reed Architects

For St. Edward’s Universit y to achieve a desired national prominence as an institution of higher learning, President George E. Martin set out in 2001 to double the student enrollment to 4,000 by 2010. Martin knew that would require significant capital improvements, so he commissioned Philadelphia’s H2L2 to masterplan the 498-acre hilltop campus.

Cristobal Palma Photography; Andy Mattern,
Artimbo.com
Page 54

Informed by the Land

by: Dror Baldinger
Architect: Craig McMahon Architects; Studio Industrielle (associated design firm)

Having neve r befo re visite d the Hill Count ry, the Futu re owne rs we re charmed by the natural beauty of the site where they eventually would build their house. Majestic oaks frame the views of distant farmland as the 350-acre property drops a 100 feet to the Guadalupe River.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 60

Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas – New Family Center

by: Susan Butler
Architect: HDR Architecture

Located on the seventh floor of Baylor University Medical Center’s Truett Tower in Dallas, the New Family Center is a 22,000-sf renovation specializing in postpartum healthcare services.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 69

Bridging the Gap

by: Megan Headley

We’ll admit it, there’s a lot more to a building than just the glass. And while we as an industry are charged with knowing the ins and outs of all the countless types of glass products available— architects are being overwhelmed by the need to know so much more.

Photo: Shutterstock
Page 70

A Clear Vision

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Kirksey

The new Cullen Eye Institute in the Medical Building of Baylor College of Medicine in the Texas Medical Center combines multiple adult ophthalmology subspecialties under one roof. Dr. Dan B. Jones, chair of the Ophthalmology Department at Baylor, recognized the need to consolidate the existing adult ophthalmology practice into a single building on the new McNair Campus.

Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 72

Living Laboratory

by: Urs Peter Flueckiger

As our planet’s reserves of water and energy sources become increasingly limited, architects must develop forms of architecture that incorporate – even celebrate – sustainability design practices. Toward that end, my students at Texas Tech University are engaged in an ongoing project that focuses on a variety of solutions. The result is a living laboratory designed for the harsh microclimate of Foard County about 45 miles west of Wichita Falls.

Images by Urs Peter Flueckiger
Page 84

Fierce Competition

by: Stephen Sharpe

The effects of the economic downturn are now clearly apparent across the state. The evidence is rendered in less-than-optimistic forecasts as firms cautiously plan for 2010. The recession is brought into sharper relief when compared with the robust business climate enjoyed by design professionals for a decade prior to last year’s fourth quarter.

Photo courtesy University Health Syst em
Page 7

Charles Gwathmey 1938-2009

by: Juan Miro, AIA

Charles Gwathmey – Charlie, as most people called him – started off his career with a bang. Like two other giants of the American arts, Orson Wells and Norman Mailer, Charlie produced a masterpiece while he was still in his 20s. After graduating from Yale, Charlie traveled through Europe where he was able to experience first-hand the works of his most admired Modernist master, Le Corbusier.

Photo at left by Rosa Rivera; photo at right courtesy Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects
Page 19

Solar LED Fascia

University of Houston students Daniel De La Garza, Jared Wilson Thorn, Alfonso Villafuerte, and Chukwunoso Ofili have developed a concept for an eco-friendly, multi-purpose lighting system that could serve nightly as neighborhood and home security lighting and as solar-powered emergency lighting during power shortages.

Page 28

Design Awards 2009

The 2009 TSA Design Awards jury met in Austin on May 15 to view 261 submittals of built work. The jurors were Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, of Hargreaves Associates (San Francisco, Cambridge, and New York); Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects (Tucson); and Philip Freelon, FAIA, of the Freelon Group (Durham, N.C.)

Illustrations by Bryce Weigand
Page 39

A Sonnet to Dwell In

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

The area just north of downtown Dallas known as Oak Lawn is rich and diverse in demographics, land use, and building types. Having matured over time, Oak Lawn has evolved into a neighborhood of restaurants, churches, hotels, offices, and a varied assemblage of residential buildings.

Jason Franzen; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 48

Garden Spot

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Cunningham Architects

From the street Cunningham Architects’ House in the Garden is a beautifully conceived and executed object, partially shielded behind an iconic wall constructed of stainless-steel wire grid and filled with fragments of slag glass. This idealized garden villa – really a giant porch – provides a delightful way to both view and inhabit a highly personalized landscape. It’s a thoughtful and well organized bit of place making; surprisingly its greatest success is as a foil and extension of an outdoor space that was originally part of the adjacent house.

James F. Wilson, Gisela Borghi; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 52

Concrete Poetry

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: Elliott + Associates Architects

This word painting by Rand Elliott, FAIA, explains how he wants people to understand his latest award-winning project, ImageNet of Houston. Employing poetry or manifestoes to describe one’s work is not uncommon these days. Indeed, such material appears to be a prerequisite of the current media culture that promotes “starchitects,” “signature architects,” and one-hit wonders. Supportive text is, we are led to believe, required reading. If a building appears mundane, baffling, or otherwise underwhelming, just refer to the narrative. Within the architect’s words, we are told, lies the true meaning which will assure in our prosaic times that, yes, this is Architecture.

Scott McDonald, Hedrich Blessing; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 56

Haven for Art

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Laguarda Low Architects

Once just another nondescript, single-story building indistinguishable from its neighbors that together comprise a light-industrial district wedged between downtown Dallas and the Trinity River, the Light & Sie Art Gallery now stands out. The reconfigured entry, framed by a box of aluminum panels, asserts a refined presence that quietly commands attention amid the clutter of storefronts along Leslie Street on the city’s near-west side. The 13,000-sf project is one of the latest examples in a transformative trend for the area where a few of the shopworn buildings have been repurposed as showrooms for the design trade and retail galleries for contemporary art.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 60
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