Article Results for "Award"

Grading School Design

by: Bob Hackler

Thirty years ago I left teaching in the public school classroom and headed for graduate school and a degree in architecture at Texas A&M. Nine years of classroom duty have greatly influenced my perception of what constitutes quality educational environs for students and faculty. They were an influence again while serving last year as a juror for TASA/TASB’s annual school design award program.

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Tivy High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Pfluger Associates, Architects with Artisan Group, Inc.

Designed by Pfluger Associates, Tivy High School received the Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the 2005 TASA /TAS B Exhibit of School Architecture. Having long outgrown the district’s previous high school building, Kerrville ISD opened the 269,302-sf school in August 2003.

Robert Fiertek; Gary Hatch
Page 55

Richardson High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: PBK Architects, Inc.

Previously serving grades 10-12, Richardson High School admitted 720 freshmen earlier this year. PBK Architects designed the campus renovations and additions to provide space for the increased student population. The project received TASA /TAS B Exhibit of School Architecture awards in the value, design, educational appropriateness, and process of planning categories.

Jud Haggard Photography
Page 59

Mansfield Timberview High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Huckabee & Associates, Inc.

Completed in May 2004, Mansfield Timberview High School received awards in the value, design, and educational appropriateness categories in the 2005 Exhibit of School Architecture. Huckabee & Associates designed the 420,000-sf campus using cost-effective building solutions to minimize maintenance expenses for the life of the campus structures, including a total masonry system and terrazzo floors.

Paul Chaplo
Page 62

Spicewood Elementary School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Fromberg Associates, Ltd.

Completed in May 2004, Spicewood Elementary received awards in the value, design, & process of planning categories in the 2005 Exhibit of School Architecture. Modeled after another local elementary school campus designed by Fromberg Associates, the architects incorporated lessons learned and updated the materials palette to reflect the school’s rural Hill-Country setting

Randy Fromberg, AIA
Page 63

2005 Golden Trowel Awards

by: Lawrence Connolly

The Texas Masonry Council’s Golden Trowel Awards is one of the three awards programs for Texas architects, the other two being TSA and the Texas Association of School Administrators/Texas Association of School Boards.

Aker-Zvonkovic photography
Page 65

One Hundred Years of Studio

by: Stephen Sharpe

This June marks the centennial of the first graduating class from any school in Texas that taught architecture as a degree program. The degrees in architectural engineering were awarded to three young men at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, now known as Texas A&M University.

courtesy of TAMU College of Architecture
Page 80

Kraus Among AIA’s 2006 ‘Young Architects’

Shannon Kraus, AIA, of Dallas is among the six recipients of the 2006 AIA Young Architects Award, the annual recognition of professionals who have been licensed 10 years or fewer regardless of their age. This award honors individuals who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession early in their careers.

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Corpus Christi Awards Five Projects

AIA Corpus Christi awarded five projects during the chapter’s 2005 Design Awards ceremony held on Dec. 8 at the American Bank Center, one of the projects honored with an award. The jury – John DeSalvo, AIA, of Booth Hansen Architects; Frank Key, AIA, of Frank P. Key and Associates; and Jana McCann, AIA, of ROMA Design Group – selected the projects from 25 submittals entered by 10 local firms.

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AIA Lubbock Design Awards Announced

Two projects received Honor Awards in AIA Lubbock’s 2005 Design Awards ceremony held on Dec. 5. The jury – David E. Lewis, AIA, of David E. Lewis, Architect; MJ Neal, AIA, of MJ Neal Architects; and Al York, AIA, of McKinney Architects – selected the award recipients among the entries.

Page 12

AIA Austin Awards Eleven Projects

AIA Austin honored 11 projects during the chapter’s 2006 Awards and Honors Gala held on Feb.25 at the Seaholm Power Plant. The projects were selected from a pool of 69 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 14

Institute for Jazz Studies

Jeffrey Olgin, an architecture student at Texas Tech University, recently received the 2005 form•Z University Joint Study Award of Distinction in Architecture for his conceptual design for the Institute for Jazz Studies. Designed for a site at historic Fort Adams Park in Rhode Island where the Newport Jazz Festival takes place each year, the project consists of two distinct buildings that house the campus and museum, along with a bridging element that connects them to performance spaces.

Page 16

AIA Houston Presents Design Awards

AIA Houston recognized 15 projects in the chapter’s 2006 Design Awards. The jury – Margaret Helfand of Helfand Architecture; Steve Cassell of Architecture Research Office; Zack McKown of Tsao & McKown Architects; and Rob Rogers of Rogers Marvel Architects – selected the winners from 113 submittals.

Page 14

AIA West Texas Awards Five Projects

Five projects received awards in AIA West Texas’s 2006 Design Awards. The projects were reviewed by a panel three jurors—Ray Bailey, FAIA, of Bailey Architects; Rick Archer, FAIA, of Overland Partners; and Dan Shipley, FAIA, of Shipley Architects.

Page 15

Regional Inflections

by: Stephen Sharpe

This year’s Design Awards jury offered a study in regional vernacular, but not the architectural kind. It was their voices that fixed them to identifiable places on the map and hinted at the experiences that frame their sensibilities.

Paul Finkel
Page 5

TSA Announces 2006 Honor Awards

by: TA Staff

The Texas Society of Architects has announced its annual Honor Awards to recognize significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment. The Honor Awards will be presented during the TSA annual convention scheduled Nov. 2-4 in Dallas.

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Rehab of Historic ‘Rock Ranch’ Recognized by Preservationists

by: J. Brantley Hightower

In his essay “The Necessity for Ruins,” J.B. Jackson writes of the importance of an “interval of neglect” in the history of a built object or landscape. “Ruins,” he notes, “provide the incentive for restoration, and for a return to origins.” While the old adage – we only miss things once they are gone – may very well be true, Jackson proposes that we also can appreciate things while they are here and take action before those things are lost forever.

Photos courtesy Steph en B. Cha mbers, AIA
Page 12

Design Awards 2006

by: Michael Malone

Architects rarely have the opportunity to view the best work of their peers from around the state, so the TS A Design Awards’ jury review offers a unique vantage point. The event is much like a window from which to see the diversity of scope, scale, and issues our fellow professionals are working with. Sitting in while the jury meets is exciting. It also can be a humbling experience and, at moments, distressing when projects you believe have merit are summarily rejected.

staff photos
Page 30

2006 Design Awards Jury

by: Michael Malone

This year’s jury was exceptional in a number of ways—particularly for its regional diversity (Boston, New York City, and Baton Rouge) and the sheer number of awards its three jurors have amassed for design (more than 150 among them). Also notable to anyone observing the jurors working together was their commitment to rewarding excellence through careful review and consensus. Shown from left to right, the jurors were:

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Addison Pavilion


Architect: Cunningham Architects

The Pavilion defines the entry point of the Addison Arts and Events District. The Pavilion’s steel frame supports a flat roof deck of natural pine.

James F. Wilson; Craig Kuhner
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Austin City Lofts


Architect: Page Southerland Page

This 82-unit, 14-story tower provides an anchor and landmark for a new mixed-use district in the southwest quadrant of downtown. A three-story, horizontal, stone volume houses the entry lobby, deep stacked porches, and a modest retail strip off a shady arcade. Parking for 164 vehicles is tucked behind and below.

Tim Griffith Photography
Page 34

Bonfire Memorial


Architect: Overland Partners Architects

On Nov. 18, 1999, the 55-foot-tall stack under construction for the annual Bonfire collapsed, killing 12 Texas A&M students and injuring 27 others. The memorial is intended to open outside eyes to a deep, strong spirit and tradition that has united thousands of Aggies.

Frank White Photography
Page 36

Commerce Street Townhomes


Architect: Ron Wommack, FAIA

The eight-unit, inner-city townhouse project is located on a long-abandoned site in a former manufacturing area east of downtown Dallas. Two industrial structures across the street had been renovated into residential dwellings, and this project forms another street wall to bring scale and intimacy to this neighborhood.

Charles Smith
Page 38

Corinth Civil War Center


Architect: Overland Partners Architects

A joint project between the National Park Service and the Corinth Siege and Battle Commission, the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center commemorates Corinth’s critical role in the Civil War.

Osborne Photography
Page 40

Cup City


Architect: Legge Lewis Legge

Cup City, a temporary interactive lounge sponsored by Starbucks, was constructed over the course of the three-day Austin City Limits Music Festival using 41 (6 x 15-foot) fence panels, zip ties, and approximately 25,000 pieces of garbage.

Legge Lewis Legge
Page 42

The Envelope


Architect: Buchanan Architecture

Rather than accepting the most general issues of zoning compliance, this project offers a very detailed response to the zoning constraints and its exceptions. The design solution should be considered, in part, as a product of thorough zoning research.

Jason Franzen
Page 44

The 505


Architect: Collaborative Designworks

The 505, a four-unit townhouse development, sits near Houston’s rejuvenated downtown. The architect spearheaded the project as an experimental design exercise that works within the economic and market constraints of a speculative housing development. The 505 sought to be financially successful and to make responsible use of land, incorporate sustainable design principles, enhance community sensibilities, and possess an architectural identity.

Aker/Zvoncovik Photography; G. Lyon Photography
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Floating Box House


Architect: Peter L Gluck and Partners, Architects

Surrounded by a grove of more than 200 live oaks, the house is located just outside Austin and stands between the city’s new urban skyline and its rural past.

Paul Warchol
Page 48

Footbridge


Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

With a design inspired in the reeds that line the edges of the lake, this pedestrian bridge is a light structure integrated with its setting. The bars/reeds intertwine at the abutments and “grow” over the bridge, camouflaging and turning it into a symbiotic, almost invisible link.

Paul Finkel
Page 50

Government Canyon


Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

The Visitor Center floats in a field of native grasses and restored oaks at the mouth of the canyon, forming a gateway to the 8,600-acre Government Canyon State Natural Area. The canyon’s rich ranching history is expressed in the exposed pipe structure.

Chris Cooper
Page 52

Guerra Branch Library


Architect: Sprinkle Robey Architects

The Guerra Branch Library is located in a working class, military neighborhood in San Antonio. Inspired by the soaring hangars at the adjacent Air Force Base, the building is organized in three volumes that are oriented to define an existing green space to the north and east, while limiting the harsh sunlight from the south and west.

Paul Hester
Page 54

Health & Science Building


Architect: Hellmuth, Obata + Kassabaum

The program is for a new Health and Science Building. The facility houses the chemistry, geology, biology, and physics/astronomy departments within the Natural Sciences Program, and the nursing, respiratory, occupational therapy, and dental hygiene departments within the Health Program.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 56

Lake Tahoe Residence


Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

The historic mines of the region, with their simple shed forms on the sloping land, were the inspiration for the project. Use of exposed concrete, eathered wood, and rusted steel create a palette of low-maintenance materials. The crisp exterior materials give way to warm, natural woods on the interiors.

Jeff Dow Photography
Page 58

McKinney Farm House


Architect: Ron Wommack, FAIA

The project comprises a new barn and house built on a 150-acre farm just northeast of McKinney. A screened porch connects the 3,500-sq. ft. house to a carport and utility structure. The house is constructed of concrete block, cypress siding, glass, and galvanized metal.

Charles Smith
Page 60

Methodist Healthcare Ministries


Architect: Kell Muñoz Architects, Inc.

The architect’s commission for a new building to house the largest charitable religious foundation in South Texas was based upon the designers’ ability to represent the visionary culture of Methodist “works.” The client asked for a headquarters that would represent the purity and simplicity of the foundation’s calling to help the poor with healthcare while quietly asserting its importance to the region.

R. Greg Hursley; Chris Cooper; Paul Hester
Page 62

Rocking F Ranch


Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Farmhouse vernacular inspired this family retreat in rural Central Texas. The compound consists of three buildings that define the perimeter of a central yard skirting an oak grove—the main building with living areas and kitchen on the ground floor and guest rooms upstairs, a bedroom wing with the master suite in a tower adjacent to the children’s bedroom, and a carport.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 64

Sarofim Research Building


Architect: BNIM Architects

The Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building houses core research laboratories, administrative offices, and a glass auditorium. Located in the Texas Medical Center, the parti consists of a central atrium flanked by two wings—the southern containing administrative offices and the northern containing labs. The openness of the adjoining atrium gardens invites public passage through the building, giving the program a sense of transparency.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 66

School of Nursing


Architect: BNIM Architects with Lake/Flato Architects

The School of Nursing enhances human health and productivity while having as little impact on the environment as possible. It is itself a healthy building that was built with 50-percent recycled materials and designed to reduce energy use by 40 percent and water use by 60 percent. The project, submitted for a LEE D Gold rating, was selected by the AIA Committee on the Environment as a 2006 Top Ten Green Project.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 68

Stonehedge Residence


Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

The challenge of this project was to work on a house (built in the 1980s) that the clients had recently renovated, but that they felt still needed further adjustments to improve the connection of the house’s interior spaces with the existing swimming pool and garden and to improve the quality of the public spaces of the house.

Paul Finkel of Piston Design
Page 70

Texas Hillel


Architect: Alterstudio Architects with Black + Vernooy Architecture and Urban Design

The design focused on two principal goals—to orchestrate an inviting building that would encourage students to venture within and to create a place where spirituality would be part of everyday life, not something removed to a sacred sphere.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 72

Wesley Gallery


Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

An abandoned stable of crumbling adobe and concrete was converted to a permanent gallery.

Andy Mattern, Artimbo
Page 74

World Birding Center


Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

The design approach was to do more with less. The architecture learned from the regional vernacular, responded to the harsh climate, and minimized disturbance of existing habitat. The building creates a gateway between disturbed agricultural land and a 1,700-acre native habitat preserve.

Paul Hester
Page 76

TSA studio Awards

by: Stephen Sharpe

The review of Studio Award entries followed the jury’s finalizing its selections for Design Awards. From the 48 submittals, the jury kept 14 for a second round before deciding to award seven projects. Three of them in particular garnered praise from the jurors—Square of Circles by Jay Smith, AIA, of Dallas; Houston Skyscraper by Michael Kross, an architecture student at Rice University; and Design>Build>Texas by architecture students at UT Austin.

Page 78

CUBE


Architect: RTKL Associates

The concept is to create a single powerful iconic statement for the new focus of the Penn Plaza District. The idea is to make a singular architectural statement that has multiple identities, andmultiple reads.

Page 78

Unity Plaza Station


Architect: RTKL Associates

Like the vestibules and livings rooms of a residence, a city’s plazas are spaces of civic and cultural significance that articulate the urban structure.

Page 79

Design>Build>Texas


Architect: UT Austin School of Architecture

The architecture school recently initiated and completed Design>Build>Texas, a design/build studio for upper-level architecture students. This course was developed as an educational prototype as well as a prototype for the design and construction of an environmentally responsible house

Page 79

Square of Circles


Architect: Jay Smith, AIA

This design was a winning entry in the 2006 Ultimate Tree House design competition held by the Dallas Arboretum (see p. 120). The program required that the tree house be interactive, meet state accessibility requirements, and not attach to the tree.

Page 80

Hector Garcia Middle School


Architect: Perkins + Will

The architectural design for a new 175,000-sq. ft. school for 1,200 students reflects the programmed social organization planned around three teams of students per grade level, and includes a diverse range of academic spaces to support traditional, interdisciplinary, and project-based instructional models.

Page 80

MICA


Architect: RTKL Associates

A new 121,500-sq. ft. student housing for the Maryland Institute College of Art will serve as a gateway to the campus. The building includes living modules, art studios, a gallery, a blackbox theater, and a career development center.

Page 81

Houston Skyscraper


Architect: Michael Kross, student at Rice University

Increased mobility in communications and transportation has seen the traditional central business district lose favor to peripheral centers. Nowhere is this trend more salient than in Houston, where at least one of the motivations for building tall no longer applies.

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