Article Results for "Award"


by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

Located in downtown Austin ’s fledgling 2nd Street District, the new 18-story AMLI II integrates 35,000 square feet of ground-level retail space, four and one-half levels of above-ground parking, an activity deck on the fifth level above the garage, and 231 rental apartments on 17 floors.

Casey Dunn
Page 42

Concrete Studio

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Mell Lawrence, FAIA
Page 46

Design Exploration Center

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: GBA Architecture

Faced wit h the imminent demolition of a World War II-vintage structure adjacent to the University of Houston’s College of Architecture, school officials devised a metamorphosis that not only honors the original building’s utilitarian design but also enhances scholarship on the urban campus.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers
Page 50

Edcouch Fine Arts Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Kell Muñoz

The tallest building in the delta region of the Lower Rio Grande Valley is also the first important civic building to be erected in more than 30 years to serve the small towns of Edcouch and Elsa. Sharing resources in a combined public school district, the towns are located halfway between Harlingen and Edinburg.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 54

Friends Meetinghouse

by: Jon Thompson
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

Lake /Flat o Architects ’ recent addition to the San Antonio Friends Meetinghouse represents the firm’s second phase for the local community of the Religious Society of Friends. Both phases of the Friends Meetinghouse create a concrete expression of the inner centering that is fundamental to the Quaker faith.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 58

George Allen Sr. Courthouse

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Rees Associates

The addition to and renovation of the George Allen Sr. Courthouse building consolidates all 45 of the Dallas County civil courts, formerly located in three buildings, into one central location. Providing 210,000 square feet of new pace, the addition stacks its program with the highest traffic family court spaces on the bottom, served by escalators.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 62

Indian Bean Guesthouse

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: FARO STUDIO

About an hour outside of Louisville, Kentucky, on 250 acres of rolling fields, a former tobacco farm plays host for a family’s weekend retreats—and now for their friends, too.

Jason Schmidt; Frank Doring
Page 66

Karbach Residence

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Tim Cuppett, AIA

Located just two blocks from the State Capitol, the three-story 20 x 150-foot sliver at 811 Congress represents one of the few remaining historic buildings in downtown Austin. The structure, originally built in 1874 and used over the years to house a series of retail establishments, had been ravaged by fire and abandoned when Dennis Karbach bought the property to turn it into a residence. He hired Tim Cuppett, AIA, to help him realize the potential for the 9,000-sq. ft. shell hidden beneath an outmoded 1950s-era perforated-metal brise soleil.

Paul Bardagjy; Woody Welch; Tim Cuppett
Page 70

Lake Austin Residence

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

Designed as a “village by a canal ,” this waterside residence integrates a series of small-scale, gable-roofed buildings with a narrow site along an inlet of Lake Austin. The architects of Lake/Flato once again have exhibited their adroit touch with materials and adeptness for capturing abundant outdoor views. Clustered like a rustic encampment, the individual buildings are designed to seamlessly blend their interiors with the exterior environment.

Patrick Y. Wong; Paul Hester
Page 74

Lost Pines Chapel

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: LZT Architects

Set adjacent to the east shore of Lake Bastrop, the new non-denominational openair chapel at the 400-acre Lost Pines Boy Scout Camp provides a memorable meditative experience, especially at dusk when the rustic structure frames a vista of the sun setting over the lake.

Murray Legge, AIA
Page 78

Oak Court

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

Few architects’ legacies have been more controversial than that of mid-century modernist Edward Durrell Stone. As his buildings age, they don’t engender the passion for restoration often associated with the work of his peers. Buchanan Architecture’s recent restoration and remodel of Oak Court – a palatial Stone design in Dallas from 1956 – offers a clear signal that, despite any prejudices, there is value in Stone’s buildings.

James F. Wilson
Page 82

Residence 1414 Renovation

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

As one of two Miró Rivera projects selected for Design Awards this year, the renovation of this 1940s house required a fine balance between modern updates and traditional aspects of the original design.

Paul Finkel – piston design
Page 86

Seton Medical Center

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

Seton Medical Center, the largest medical and surgical acute care center in Austin, was in desperate need of a facelift. In 2005, Seton commissioned PageSoutherlandPage to expand and renovate its 1970s-era brick building. The scope of the expansion included 110,000 square feet of new facilities, including a day surgery center, a chapel with adjacent garden, a main entranceway, and a “front door image” for the hospital. When the work was completed, both the physical identity of the building and its capacity were improved.

Tim Griffith Photographer
Page 90

Trail Restroom

by: Dror Baldinger
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

An assemblage of 49 Corten steel plates arrayed in a coil-like shape, Miró Rivera Architects’ Trail Restroom is a captivating work of brutal simplicity.

Paul Finkel –piston design; Paul Bardagjy Photography; Kraig Becker
Page 94

U.S. Courthouse

by: Mark T. Wellen
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

The U.S. Courthouse in Alpine was universally admired by this year’s Design Awards jury for its simplicity of form and masterful response to the setting. The courthouse was a product of the U.S. General Service Administration’s Design Excellence Program with PageSoutherlandPage’s Austin office as the architect selected for the project.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 98

Biomedical Learning Center

by: TA Staff
Architect: SHW Group

The SHW Group, an Austin-based architectural and planning firm best known for its educational building design, developed the University of Texas at Brownsville’s Biomedical Research Laboratories and Community Sciences Building.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 102

Bracken Bat Cave

by: TA Staff
Architect: Overland Partners Architects

Overland Partners of San Antonio has designed the environmentally sensitive 36,000-square-foot Bracken Bat Cave Nature Reserve in Comal County. The visitor’s center rests atop the underground cavern that harbors the world’s largest bat colony, home to more than 40 million Mexican free-tailed bats.

Page 104

Near Northside Study

by: TA Staff
Architect: William Truitt, AIA

The purpose of Near Northside Study conducted by William Truitt, AIA, of the University of Houston, is three-fold: to illuminate existing problems of large open-space neighborhoods that are often overlooked in inner-city studies; to highlight the potential for such neighborhoods to positively impact the larger urban area; and to propose new adjacencies that allow for growth in targeted areas over the next 30 years.

Page 106

University Research Study

by: Richard B. Ferrier, FAIA
Architect: Firm X

The University Research Study , completed by R.B Ferrier, FAIA, expands on traditional methods of architectural representation through a series of conceptual watercolor drawings. Ferrier, an associate professor at UT Arlington, teaches conceptual drawing as part of graduate design studio courses.

Page 108

High Expectations

by: Joyce Chandran

When architects from Leo A Daly’s Dallas office and engineers from its sister company, Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam in Houston, were tasked with designing a transportation facility for the Houston Independent School District, all parties concluded that it was an opportunity to set a new standard in industrial building design.

Page 144

AIA Dallas Presents Design Awards

by: AIA Dallas Staff

Ten local architectural firms, plus a student design studio from the University of Texas at Arlington, earned top honors Sept. 18 at AIA Dallas’ 2008 Design Awards presented in an open-air ceremony on AT&T Plaza at Victory Park.

Page 16

Austin Firm Garners International Award

Miró Rivera Architects’ Pedestrian Bridge was among three projects receiving top tier recognition in the 2006 The Architectural Review Awards for Emerging Architecture. Considered the best international award for young architects, the annual program celebrates the work of designers under the age of 45 who are at the start of their independent careers.

photo by Paul Finkel
Page 14

San Antonio Announces Design Awards

Twelve projects received awards in A IA San Antonio’s 2006 Design Awards. The projects were announced on Oct. 25 at a ceremony held at the Pearl Stable. The awards presentation served as the finale of the chapter’s second annual “Architecture Month.”

Page 15

AIA Fort Worth Awards Seven Projects`

by: Ivonne Levin, AIA

AIA Fort Worth recognized seven projects at the chapter’s 2006 Design Awards ceremony held at the Modern Art Museum.

Page 16

National Trust Awards Two Sites in Texas

In November, the National Trust for Historic Preservation presented its National Preservation Honor Award to projects in Texas—The Southwest School of Art and Craft in San Antonio and Socorro Mission in El Paso. The projects were among 21 national award winners honored in the National Trust’s annual awards.

courtesy library of congress; courtesy national trust
Page 17

Gloria Cisneros Pre-Kindergarten

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: SHW Group

Gloria Cisneros Pre-Kindergarten received the Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the 2006 TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture. Designed specifically with four-year-old students in mind, the 45,793-sf school provides an environment that encourages children to feel welcome.

Mark Trew
Page 49

Excellence in Brick

by: Jaime Powell
Architect: Richter Architects

In a once charming neighborhood now in desperate need of a facelift, the construction of an award-winning, new elementary school has ignited a long-awaited neighborhood revitalization.

David Richter, FAIA ; Larry Rose
Page 70

Northeast Texas 2006 Design Awards

by: Brett Patrick, AIA

Seven projects were recognized at the Northeast Texas AIA annual Christmas party and chapter meeting. The jury panel consisted of Kenneth Apel, AIA, of HKS in Dallas; Gary Kirchoff, AIA, of HH Architects in Dallas; and Andrew Vernooy, AIA, dean of the Texas Tech School of Architecture

Page 15

Texas Projects Receive AIA Honors

Three projects in Texas were among the 29 projects recognized this year with AIA’s Honor Awards, the profession’s highest recognition of works that exemplify excellence in three categories—architecture, interior architecture, and urban design. The annual competition attracted a total of almost 700 entries, with independent juries reviewing submittals in each of the categories.

Page 17

Hoogeboom Selected as AIA Young Architect

Lonnie D. Hoogeboom, AIA, a partner in the Houston firm of Natalye Appel + Associates LLC, is one of six recipients of the 2007 AIA Young Architect Award. Hoogeboom was previously honored with TSA’s Award for Young Professional Achievement in 2006.

Page 19

AIA Houston Awards 19 Projects

by: Geoffry Brune, AIA

AIA Houston honored 19 projects during the chapter’s 2007 Design Awards Dinner held on April 5 at the Majestic Metro Theater. The projects were selected from 136 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 19

Jury Selected for TSA Design Awards

The jury for the 2007 TSA Design Awards has been confirmed, with jurors scheduled to meet June 22–23 to review entries. The jury’s selections will be published in the September/October 2007 edition of Texas Architect. The awarded projects’ architects and owners will be honored during ceremonies at the TSA annual convention set Oct. 18-20 in Austin.

Page 21

25-Year Award Nominations Due June 1

The TSA 25-Year Award is an important public outreach program that focuses much-deserved attention on distinguished Texas architecture of enduring significance. The annual award recognizes a building or ensemble of buildings completed 25 to 50 years before, which has retained its central form, character, and architectural integrity.

Page 21

AIA Austin Awards 17 Projects

by: Brian Carlson

AIA Austin honored 17 projects during the chapter’s 2007 Awards and Honors Gala held on May 12 at the Texas Memorial Museum on the University of Texas campus. The projects were selected from a pool of 65 entries submitted by local firms

Page 15

Rigorous Inquiry

by: Stephen Sharpe

‘I think we’re being a little too tough,’ suggested Peter Bohlin, FAIA, as he and his two fellow jurors were finalizing their decision on this year’s Studio Awards. From a roster of 65 unbuilt entries, the jury had selected only one for an award.

Page 7

NorthPark Center Honored with TSA’s 25-Year Award

by: Stephen Sharpe

“It was the most amazing opening and we were all just delighted,” a beaming Raymond D. Nasher told a reporter after more than 150,000 people attended the grand opening of the developer’s latest project, NorthPark Center, on Aug. 19, 1965.

top photo by craig blackmon, faia; bottom photo courtesy omniplan
Page 11

TSA Announces 2007 Honor Awards

by: TA Staff

The Texas Society of Architects has announced its annual Honor Awards to recognize significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment. The Honor Awards will be presented during the TSA annual convention to be held Oct. 18-20 in Austin.

Page 13

AIA Brazos Awards Two Projects

AIA Brazos recognized two projects in the chapter’s 2007 Design Awards. The projects were selected by a jurors Wes Good, AIA, of Kirksey; Lonnie Hoogeboom, AIA, of Natalye Appel & Associates; and Donna Kacmar, AIA, of architect works

Page 23

Design Awards 2007

by: Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA

Having observed this year’s Design Awards jury, I have several thoughts. One is, why doesn’t the Texas landscape/cityscape reflect more significantly the fine work that Texas architects submitted in this year’s design award program?

Photos by Ashley St. Clair
Page 30

Casa 218

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: Candid Rogers Architect

While many Texas cities have experienced a renaissance of downtown residential development, this trend has been curiously absent in San Antonio.

Chris Cooper
Page 32

Chinati Gallery

by: Mark T. Wellen
Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

Andy Mattern
Page 36

Christ Church

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Leo A Daly/LAN + PageSoutherlandPage, A Joint Venture

Timothy Hursley
Page 40

Farley Studio

by: Richard Wintersole
Architect: M.J. Neal Architects

After a chance encounter in a Fort Worth bar, things turned out pretty well for Kyle and Angela Farley. It was there the bartender introduced Kyle, a golfer and artist, to MJ Neal, AIA, who just happened to be teaching a design studio at the University of Texas at Arlington.

Viviane Vives; M.J. Neal, AIA
Page 44

Frame/Harper House

by: Ben Koush
Architect: Stern and Bucek Architects

Genius sometimes strikes quickly. According to one of those quintessential Texas stories, architect Harwood Taylor designed his residential masterpiece for childhood friend David Frame and his wife Gloria during a flight from Midland to Houston in Frame’s private plane in 1958.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 48

House at Wind Point

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Max Levy Architect

It’s not difficult to imagine William Butler Yeats sitting in the sublime inglenook of Max Levy’s House at Wind Point composing his poem The Lake Isle of Innisfree.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Max Levy, FAIA
Page 52

Menil House

by: Bruce Webb
Architect: Stern and Bucek Architects

The house Philip Johnson designed for John and Dominique de Menil in the Briarwood subdivision introduced the International Style to Houston’s opulent and architecturally conservative River Oaks neighborhood.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 56

NorthPark Center

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Omniplan

As a second generation project for both owner and architect, the expansion of NorthPark Center both completes and refines the original design.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 60

Penn State SALA

by: Charles Rosenblum
Architect: Overland Partners Architects; WTW Architects

More than bringing together two allied disciplines of design education at Penn State, the new Stuckeman Family Building for the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture also connects two campus grids at a pivotal point.

Jeffrey Totaro/ESTO
Page 64

Roma Plaza

by: Mario L. Sanchez, PhD
Architect: Kell Muñoz Architects

On the Rio Grande, midway between Laredo and Brownsville, Roma is the stellar setting for an award-winning civic design by Kell Muñoz Architects of San Antonio.

Chris Cooper; Dustin Brown
Page 68

Royal Bank of Scotland

by: William Rios, AIA
Architect: DMJM Rottet

Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), an international financial institution offering diverse banking service to retail and corporate clients, appropriately maintains offices in downtown Houston.

Benny Chan
Page 72
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