Article Results for "ARE"

Metal Shines as Design Solution

by: Toy Henson

WHEN architects and building owners require an attractive and affordable roof or wall system for a commercial or institutional project, chances are metal will be at or near the top their list of material candidates. To be sure, there’s no shortage of commercial metal roof or wall systems from which to choose. And metal is extremely competitive with other exterior facade options because of its low life-cycle cost.

photo Courtesy the metal initiative
Page 51

Metal Takes Flight

by: Toy Henson
Architect: GRW Willis, Inc.

WITH traffic at Love Field and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport at all-time highs, Dallas’ business air travelers are finding an alternative to long lines and delays in the form of a renovated and expanded Dallas Executive Airport, formerly known as Redbird Airport.

Scott Womack
Page 58

Focal Point

by: Brian H. Griggs, Assoc. AIA

Among AIA Lubbock’s programs planned under the celebratory banner of AIA150 is a community design charrette to plan an indoor/outdoor public plaza in north Lubbock, an area in need of an economic boost to create business growth, cultural identity, and pride of place.

illustration by Brian H. Griggs, Assoc. AIA
Page 64

Dell Children’s Hospital in Austin Seeks First LEED Platinum Health-Care Rating

by: Jeanette Wiemers

On June 27, the Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas will open its doors as the first hospital in the world expected to achieve platinum LEED certification from the U.S Green Building Council. Located on approximately 32 acres of the site formerly occupied by Austin’s Robert Mueller Municipal Airport, the four-story pediatric facility will replace the downtown Children’s Hospital of Austin with a complex three times its size.

renderings courtesy karl sberger architecture
Page 17

Regent Square

The largest of nine similar high-density, mixed-use projects planned for Houston, GID Urban Development Group’s Regent Square will transform 24 acres south of Allen Parkway into a four-block community connected by pedestrian walkways.

Page 23

Clearly Enlightened

by: Dror Baldinger
Architect: Kell Muñoz Architects

Located at a very busy intersection in northwest San Antonio, the new and strikingly modern headquarters of the Methodist Healthcare Ministries (MHM) demonstrates an inspired blend of geometry, reason, and artistic instinct. From its new facility at South Texas Medical Center, the faith-based, nonprofit organization manages healthcare services an financial support to constituencies throughout the southern third of Texas. The MHM’s compositional qualities of site plan, floor plans, building sections, elevations, and details are all handled with great skill and technical control.

Joe Aker, Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 32

Masterplan

Once considered prime targets for demolition, most buildings at the 26-acre former Pearl Brewery site are now scheduled for remodeling or restoration. San Antonio-based Lake/Flato Architects created a master plan for developer Silver Ventures that is intended to transform the site into a vibrant mixed-use community within the next decade.

plan courtesy lake/flat o architects
Page 39

Found Object

by: Laurie Zapalac
Architect: Candid Rogers Architect

Just south of downtown San Antonio, nestled together within a few blocks on Lavaca Street are limestone dogtrots, wooden bungalows, and a few newcomers, including three regional modernist courtyard houses. It is a street of houses with good bones; some newly transformed, some restored more than a decade ago and a few still ripe for a keen eye and some elbow grease.

Chris Cooper
Page 42

United Way Center

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Gensler

In contrast to its previous ‘anonymous’ office building, United Way’s new campus near downtown Houston establishes a highly visible presence for the nonprofit organization that is also an asset to the surrounding community. Composed of two brick-and-glass buildings, a parking garage, and gardens, the 90,000-sf complex designed by Gensler was completed in March 2005.

Joe Aker, Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 57

A Certifiable Risk

by: Jim Atkins, FAIA and Grant A. Simpson, FAIA

The architect’s certification of contractor applications for payment can be perhaps the most perplexing of all the architect’s construction phase responsibilities. Although architects are neither accountants nor construction experts and do not observe each piece of work as it is put in place, they are nonetheless generally expected to provide a professional certification that the contractor’s application for payment has been verified and is correct.

Image copyright Losevsky Pavel, 2007 Shutterstock, Inc.
Page 61

Beware of Dangerous Terms

by: Richard Crowell

It is important that design professionals avoid requirements for certifying, guaranteeing or warranting in their professional contracts. By doing so, they assume a level of liability beyond the standard of care, a condition which is not covered by professional liability insurance policies.

Page 64

Menil Collection Celebrates 20 Years

by: Wendy Price Todd

On April 21 the Menil Collection commemorated its twentieth anniversary with a rare public lecture by its renowned architect Renzo Piano. From the lawn of the acclaimed museum, the architect addressed an audience of more than 1,000 who came to learn about the project that Piano described as a “portrait of a person”—Dominique deMenil. An extraordinary patron, she also is credited for giving his firm, Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW), of Genoa and Paris its first American commission.

george hixson, Hickey-robertson;
Page 9

Legislative Wrap-up: ‘Good Samaritan Bill’ Signed by Gov. Perry

by: TA Staff

After the dust had cleared from the tumultuous 80th Regular Session of the Texas Legislature, at least one measure that survived has enduring significance for the state’s design community. The so-called “Good Samaritan bill” (HB 823), signed into law by Gov. Rick Perr y, prov ides architects and engineers immunity while providing pro bono services following declared disaster. The bill was among the initiatives coordinated by the Texas Society of Architects.

Page 17

State Lawmakers Approve Transfer of 18 Sites to Texas Historical Commission

Also during the Regular Session, legislators transfered 18 historic sites from to the responsibility of the Texas Historical Commission, effective in January. The sites are:

Page 17

Fort Worth Museum of Science and History

Construction is set to begin in October on a new home for the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History. Designed by Legorreta+Legorreta of Mexico City with local firm Gideon Toal as the architect of record, the $65 million project will bring the museum’s total square footage to 125,500. The new building will offer more space for traveling exhibits, as well as permanently housing several added features

Page 19

Victory Park

by: David Richter, FAIA

If you have flown into Dallas Love Field at night recently you might have noticed a striking new feature in the urban landscape. It has been likened to Times Square, but from a dark-sky snapshot it seems to harken more to the scale and energy of the Ginza. Either way, this is not the typical Dallas we have come to expect.

illustrations courtesy Hillwood development; photo by jermey woodhouse | pixelchrome.com
Page 22

Radical Remedy

by: Joe Self
Architect: RTKL Associates

The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano is a vibrant diagram of the forces at play within the healthcare industry today. This new facility designed by RTKL houses a group of physicians offering their cardiovascular expertise in tandem with the larger Baylor Regional Medical Center at Plano across the drive.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 30

Instant Community

by: Carl Gromatzky, AIA
Architect: JPRA Architects

The growing trend toward mixed-use developments in the United States is a welcome change from developments of the recent past where zoning more or less dictated single-use districts and led to an overall homogenization of our urban environment. And while they have much to offer, these new mixed-use developments have challenges to overcome if they are to thrive. It is clear that for them to function as relatively self-sufficient, sustainable communities, lessons must be incorporated from urban neighborhoods that have grown up over decades or, in some cases, centuries.

Paul Bardagjy; R. Greg Hursley
Page 34

Market Driven

by: W. D. Collins II, AIA
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell

Park Place Motorcars, having previously worked with Good Fulton & Farrell on several other automobile dealerships, asked the architects to provide a contemporary design for the sales and service areas of its new Mercedes-Benz dealership on Lemmon Avenue in Dallas. The owner wanted the new facility to reflect the shift in marketing strategy that Mercedes-Benz was undertaking to appeal to a broader market, particularly younger consumers of luxury automobiles. According to the architects, their primary objective was to express the lifestyle that Mercedes-Benz owners enjoy rather than design a place to sell cars.

Mark Knight
Page 42

Complex Array of Options Rewards Careful Study of Applications

by: Hank Chamberlain

With such abundance of new glazing technologies, the salient issue is what to do with them. These are not just new colors or patterns of existing products. Many of the new products are functionally different. Each new category of products adds a new parameter to the design optimization process. Opportunities abound for combining several of the new technologies in a single application.

Page 56

‘Adventures’ on the Bayou

by: Barrie Scardino

In the six months since Architecture Center Houston opened, ArCH has welcomed more than 2,500 people to a wide range of activities – from workshops and exhibitions to architecture walking tours and even a small concert – but we are most excited about an event coming up this summer.

photographs by joe aker | a-z photography
Page 64

In Mississippi, Houston Design Firms Assist Post-Katrina Housing Recovery

by: Kari Smith

Two years after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, the residents of this once-close-knit Mississippi community are still trying to recover from unprecedented devastation. In some areas of East Biloxi, nearly 80 percent of housing is estimated to have been lost or made uninhabitable from the hurricane.

Top photo courtesy MC 2; bottom photo by Brett Zamore
Page 15

Linda Pace (1945–2007)

by: Jim Poteet

On July 2, San Antonio lost Linda Pace, the city’s greatest patron of contemporary art and architecture, after a six-month battle with cancer. The daughter of Pace Foods founder David Pace and Margaret Pace Willson, a founder of the Southwest School of Art and Craft, she studied art at Trinity University. Pace later became an accomplished artist and prodigious art collector.

Photos Courtesy Artpace San Antonio; Top photo Copyright 2002 James McGoon.
Page 20

Abu Dhabi Hospital and Clinic

Located in Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, the new hospital and clinic will represent a new age for Arabian healthcare. The Dallas office of Perkins+Will has designed this iconic 2.2 million-square foot building.

Page 24

Roma Plaza

by: Mario L. Sanchez, PhD
Architect: Kell Muñoz Architects

On the Rio Grande, midway between Laredo and Brownsville, Roma is the stellar setting for an award-winning civic design by Kell Muñoz Architects of San Antonio.

Chris Cooper; Dustin Brown
Page 68

Satterfield & Pontikes

by: Chris Koon, AIA
Architect: Kirksey

The new corporate headquarters in Houston for Satterfield & Pontikes Construction represents a rare building type where both the contractor and the client are one and the same.

Jud Haggard
Page 76

Triple-S Steel

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

Glimpsed from a half-mile away, the first sight of Triple-S Steel Supply’s new facility in San Antonio is a welcome anomaly amidst the industrial landscape of the former Kelly Air Force Base.

Chris Cooper
Page 80

zeroHouse


Architect: Specht Harpman

ZeroHouse is a 650-square-foot prefabricated house designed to operate autonomously, with no need for utilities or waste connections. It generates its own electrical power, collects and stores rainwater, and processes all waste.

Page 84

Memorial Hermann Medical Plaza

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Kirksey

The new 31-story addition to the Texas Medical Center (TMC) offers 500,000-sf of retail, ambulatory surgery, and professional office space to an area that previously lacked adequate lease space for physicians.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 87

TSA Convention Preview: Exhibitors

The Texas Society of Architects is pleased to announce the list of companies participating in the 2007 Expo in Austin (current as of August 1). Expo dates are October 18-19 at the Austin Convention Center. Make plans now to visit their booths, pick up new product information, ask a question, or just see a friend. Keep and use this handy guide as a reference tool. With over 200 companies listed, you will find products to fulfill your architectural needs.

Page 98

Sacred Places Unforsaken

by: Stephen Sharpe

Every Texan seems to know of an old church somewhere that has been abandoned and left to molder. Mention the topic and inevitably someone will recall the house of worship they attended as a child, maybe a magnificent edifice just off the downtown square torn down long ago or else an idyllic whitewashed clapboard chapel now tilting precariously in an overgrown field.

Photo by Erin Marie Hawkins
Page 5

IIDA Awards Five Interiors Projects

by: Megan Braley

In August, the Texas/Oklahoma chapter of the International Interior Design Association awarded its 2007 Design Excellence Awards to five entries. The winning projects were selected in the institutional, retail, healthcare, residential, and corporate categories. In addition, eight projects received Honorable Mention awards and three projects were presented the coveted Pinnacle Award.

Page 11

NYC’s Stern to Design Bush Library

While its exact site on the SMU campus remains undeclared, the architect of the future Bush Library is known—Robert A.M. Stern Architects of New York City. The architect selection was made public in late August. Stern’s office beat out two Texas firms that also had been short-listed, Lawrence W. Speck Studio of Page Southerland Page in Austin and Overland Partners of San Antonio.

Page 14

Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design

The Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Israel recently held an international competition for the design of a new campus near the center of Jerusalem. Corgan Associates submitted two entries, including the one shown here that incorporates traditional Jerusalem architectural elements – such as courtyards and gardens – to anchor the 322,500 square-foot campus to its historic surroundings.

Page 16

Solar House

Scheduled for completion next fall, the 5,000-square-foot residence is designed by Adams Architects as the first fully sustainable residential building in Houston. The project employs an intricate steel structure that props 150 photovoltaic panels 12 inches above the roof.

Page 16

Sacred Roots

by: Anat Geva, PhD

The study of the mid-nineteenth-century European immigration in south central Texas shows that the massive waves of different ethnic groups (including Czechs, Germans, Wends, Swedes, Poles, and French) arrived in Texas directly from Europe. They landed in Galveston and then spread into the rural areas of south central Texas. They brought with them a deep sense of religion and cultural heritage, and were quick to organize congregations and build their houses and churches in their new location, establishing cohesive communities.

Bethlehem Lutheran Church Image Courtesy Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Buildings Survey, HA BS TEX,75-ROUN T,2-
Page 18

Portrait of a Richly Layered City

by: R. Lawrence Good, FAIA

Hosting the national convention of the American Institute of Architects brings to the local AIA chapter an unwritten responsibility to continue the long string of guidebooks to the architecture of the host cities. Not since 1986 had San Antonio hosted the national convention, and prepared a comprehensive guide to its built environment.

Page 21

Simply Familiar

by: Chris Schultz, AIA
Architect: Marmon Mok

On the verge of the dense riverside forest that defines the campus edge of Seton Home on the nearsouth side of San Antonio, the Bunny Raba Chapel imparts a comforting familiarity. The small chapel’s broad, sloping roof and its pronounced gable front brings to mind the children’s finger puzzle that accompanies the nursery rhyme: “Here is the church and here is the steeple; open the doors and here are the people.” For the teenage mothers and mothers-to-be living at Seton Home, such iconic imagery undoubtedly offers welcome solace to their tumultuous lives. Yet, the chapel’s outward simplicity belies an underlying sophistication in planning.

Chris Cooper and Dror Baldinger, AIA
Page 24

Human Temple

by: James M. Evans, AIA
Architect: Natalye Appel + Associates Architects

Every new project affords the architect an opportunity and a challenge to develop a design concept that will take the built work beyond utilitarian shelter. For residential design this challenge can be even more difficult due to the extreme personal nature of the spaces to be created for the client, someone who has often spent a great deal of time considering what they expect from their new dwelling. For the Jain Residence, Natalye Appel + Associates Architects worked with the clients’ initial ideas for the project and expanded upon them to create an exceptionally well-articulated house.

Mark Green
Page 42

The Most Stylish Floors of Tomorrow Today

by: D. Christopher Davis

Linen textured tiles, century-old wood, bamboo rugs, buttery leather, and sponge are just some of the new looks that have donned the floors at the premium floor covering tradeshow, Surfaces, sponsored by the World Floor Covering Association. WFCA, the industry’s largest advocacy organization representing specialty floor covering retailers, manufacturers, distributors, and contractors, offers a top-line overview of the fashionable looks that are making their way to the floors of homes and businesses across the country this year.

P. 54 Photo Courtesy Anderson hardwood Floors; P. 55 Photo courtesy shawfloors.com
Page 52

Learning Curve

by: Stephen Sharpe

Hyperbolic paraboloids, to say the least, are uncommon on campuses these days. Modernism generally eschews such expressionist gestures. However, featured in this edition are several recent projects that defy the typically staid norm for academia by embodying evocative forms certain to capture attention and provoke thought.

Page 5

School of the Woods–High School

Scheduled to open its doors in August, the School of the Woods-High School in Houston strives to enable experiential learning through its environment. Natalye Appel + Associates Architects with Architectsworks are set to complete the $10 million project.

Page 22

Words of Wisdom

Texas Architect posed the question: “What advice would you give to graduating architecture students?” The responses from the practitioners and educators who were asked ranged from the practical to the ideological to the intellectual. The heart of all their messages is to follow one’s heart and trust in intuition when making choices about where to work and in which area to focus.

Paul Hester
Page 30

Smart Growth

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects in collaboration with Overland Partners Architects

From its beginnings in 1913, the Hockaday School in Dallas has honed a reputation for providing “girls of strong potential” with an education of academic excellence and social responsibility founded on Miss Ela Hockaday’s original Four Cornerstones—character, courtesy, scholarship, and athletics. That she selected an architectural metaphor to classify essential strengths is meaningful in light of recent major additions and refinements to the school.

Blackink Architectural Photography
Page 38

Wise Investment

by: Rick Lewis
Architect: O’Neill Conrad Oppelt Architects, Inc.

The building of new public schools is a thriving enterprise in Texas and – a consequence of this era of unprecedented housing development expansion – nowhere is the boom in school construction more obvious than in the suburbs. While urban school districts struggle to accommodate students on cramped campuses sometimes haphazardly knitted together with modular classrooms, families living “beyond the loop” are afforded the benefit of seeing their tax dollars invested in schools. Cibolo, on the northeast outskirts of San Antonio, is just such a community.

Greg Hursley
Page 44

Out of the Box

by: Rebecca Boles
Architect: Hahnfeld Hoffer Stanford; Ellerbe Becket

The expanding curricula at Texas Christian University has generated the need for new buildings. As new programs have been added, TCU has been consistently infilling the campus master plan, adding approximately 600,000 square feet of new construction since 1996. Steve and Sarah Smith Entrepreneurs Hall, completed in February 2003, represents the second joint venture at TCU between design architect Ellerbe Becket and architect-of-record Hahnfeld Hoffer Stanford. The team also produced TCU’s Tucker Technology Center the year before.

Chad Davis
Page 48

Mansfield Timberview High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Huckabee & Associates, Inc.

Completed in May 2004, Mansfield Timberview High School received awards in the value, design, and educational appropriateness categories in the 2005 Exhibit of School Architecture. Huckabee & Associates designed the 420,000-sf campus using cost-effective building solutions to minimize maintenance expenses for the life of the campus structures, including a total masonry system and terrazzo floors.

Paul Chaplo
Page 62

Excerpt from the Attorney General’s Opinion

Re: Whether a professional engineer may prepare all plans and specifications for a public building described in Occupations Code section 1051.703(a) without engaging the services of a licensed architect

Page 8

Kraus Among AIA’s 2006 ‘Young Architects’

Shannon Kraus, AIA, of Dallas is among the six recipients of the 2006 AIA Young Architects Award, the annual recognition of professionals who have been licensed 10 years or fewer regardless of their age. This award honors individuals who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession early in their careers.

Page 14

Framing Publics

Framing Publics is a proposal for a newspaper’s broadcasting station located in New York City’s Bryant Park. Designed by Cathlyn Newell and Judson Moore, graduate students at Rice University’s School of Architecture, the project simultaneously constructs and supports two different kinds of “publics”—the physical area within the park and the virtual realm of broadcast news.

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