Article Results for "ARE"

Memorial Hermann Medical Plaza

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Kirksey

The new 31-story addition to the Texas Medical Center (TMC) offers 500,000-sf of retail, ambulatory surgery, and professional office space to an area that previously lacked adequate lease space for physicians.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 87

TSA Convention Preview: Exhibitors

The Texas Society of Architects is pleased to announce the list of companies participating in the 2007 Expo in Austin (current as of August 1). Expo dates are October 18-19 at the Austin Convention Center. Make plans now to visit their booths, pick up new product information, ask a question, or just see a friend. Keep and use this handy guide as a reference tool. With over 200 companies listed, you will find products to fulfill your architectural needs.

Page 98

Sacred Places Unforsaken

by: Stephen Sharpe

Every Texan seems to know of an old church somewhere that has been abandoned and left to molder. Mention the topic and inevitably someone will recall the house of worship they attended as a child, maybe a magnificent edifice just off the downtown square torn down long ago or else an idyllic whitewashed clapboard chapel now tilting precariously in an overgrown field.

Photo by Erin Marie Hawkins
Page 5

IIDA Awards Five Interiors Projects

by: Megan Braley

In August, the Texas/Oklahoma chapter of the International Interior Design Association awarded its 2007 Design Excellence Awards to five entries. The winning projects were selected in the institutional, retail, healthcare, residential, and corporate categories. In addition, eight projects received Honorable Mention awards and three projects were presented the coveted Pinnacle Award.

Page 11

NYC’s Stern to Design Bush Library

While its exact site on the SMU campus remains undeclared, the architect of the future Bush Library is known—Robert A.M. Stern Architects of New York City. The architect selection was made public in late August. Stern’s office beat out two Texas firms that also had been short-listed, Lawrence W. Speck Studio of Page Southerland Page in Austin and Overland Partners of San Antonio.

Page 14

Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design

The Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Israel recently held an international competition for the design of a new campus near the center of Jerusalem. Corgan Associates submitted two entries, including the one shown here that incorporates traditional Jerusalem architectural elements – such as courtyards and gardens – to anchor the 322,500 square-foot campus to its historic surroundings.

Page 16

Solar House

Scheduled for completion next fall, the 5,000-square-foot residence is designed by Adams Architects as the first fully sustainable residential building in Houston. The project employs an intricate steel structure that props 150 photovoltaic panels 12 inches above the roof.

Page 16

Sacred Roots

by: Anat Geva, PhD

The study of the mid-nineteenth-century European immigration in south central Texas shows that the massive waves of different ethnic groups (including Czechs, Germans, Wends, Swedes, Poles, and French) arrived in Texas directly from Europe. They landed in Galveston and then spread into the rural areas of south central Texas. They brought with them a deep sense of religion and cultural heritage, and were quick to organize congregations and build their houses and churches in their new location, establishing cohesive communities.

Bethlehem Lutheran Church Image Courtesy Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Buildings Survey, HA BS TEX,75-ROUN T,2-
Page 18

Portrait of a Richly Layered City

by: R. Lawrence Good, FAIA

Hosting the national convention of the American Institute of Architects brings to the local AIA chapter an unwritten responsibility to continue the long string of guidebooks to the architecture of the host cities. Not since 1986 had San Antonio hosted the national convention, and prepared a comprehensive guide to its built environment.

Page 21

Simply Familiar

by: Chris Schultz, AIA
Architect: Marmon Mok

On the verge of the dense riverside forest that defines the campus edge of Seton Home on the nearsouth side of San Antonio, the Bunny Raba Chapel imparts a comforting familiarity. The small chapel’s broad, sloping roof and its pronounced gable front brings to mind the children’s finger puzzle that accompanies the nursery rhyme: “Here is the church and here is the steeple; open the doors and here are the people.” For the teenage mothers and mothers-to-be living at Seton Home, such iconic imagery undoubtedly offers welcome solace to their tumultuous lives. Yet, the chapel’s outward simplicity belies an underlying sophistication in planning.

Chris Cooper and Dror Baldinger, AIA
Page 24

Human Temple

by: James M. Evans, AIA
Architect: Natalye Appel + Associates Architects

Every new project affords the architect an opportunity and a challenge to develop a design concept that will take the built work beyond utilitarian shelter. For residential design this challenge can be even more difficult due to the extreme personal nature of the spaces to be created for the client, someone who has often spent a great deal of time considering what they expect from their new dwelling. For the Jain Residence, Natalye Appel + Associates Architects worked with the clients’ initial ideas for the project and expanded upon them to create an exceptionally well-articulated house.

Mark Green
Page 42

The Most Stylish Floors of Tomorrow Today

by: D. Christopher Davis

Linen textured tiles, century-old wood, bamboo rugs, buttery leather, and sponge are just some of the new looks that have donned the floors at the premium floor covering tradeshow, Surfaces, sponsored by the World Floor Covering Association. WFCA, the industry’s largest advocacy organization representing specialty floor covering retailers, manufacturers, distributors, and contractors, offers a top-line overview of the fashionable looks that are making their way to the floors of homes and businesses across the country this year.

P. 54 Photo Courtesy Anderson hardwood Floors; P. 55 Photo courtesy shawfloors.com
Page 52

Learning Curve

by: Stephen Sharpe

Hyperbolic paraboloids, to say the least, are uncommon on campuses these days. Modernism generally eschews such expressionist gestures. However, featured in this edition are several recent projects that defy the typically staid norm for academia by embodying evocative forms certain to capture attention and provoke thought.

Page 5

School of the Woods–High School

Scheduled to open its doors in August, the School of the Woods-High School in Houston strives to enable experiential learning through its environment. Natalye Appel + Associates Architects with Architectsworks are set to complete the $10 million project.

Page 22

Words of Wisdom

Texas Architect posed the question: “What advice would you give to graduating architecture students?” The responses from the practitioners and educators who were asked ranged from the practical to the ideological to the intellectual. The heart of all their messages is to follow one’s heart and trust in intuition when making choices about where to work and in which area to focus.

Paul Hester
Page 30

Smart Growth

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects in collaboration with Overland Partners Architects

From its beginnings in 1913, the Hockaday School in Dallas has honed a reputation for providing “girls of strong potential” with an education of academic excellence and social responsibility founded on Miss Ela Hockaday’s original Four Cornerstones—character, courtesy, scholarship, and athletics. That she selected an architectural metaphor to classify essential strengths is meaningful in light of recent major additions and refinements to the school.

Blackink Architectural Photography
Page 38

Wise Investment

by: Rick Lewis
Architect: O’Neill Conrad Oppelt Architects, Inc.

The building of new public schools is a thriving enterprise in Texas and – a consequence of this era of unprecedented housing development expansion – nowhere is the boom in school construction more obvious than in the suburbs. While urban school districts struggle to accommodate students on cramped campuses sometimes haphazardly knitted together with modular classrooms, families living “beyond the loop” are afforded the benefit of seeing their tax dollars invested in schools. Cibolo, on the northeast outskirts of San Antonio, is just such a community.

Greg Hursley
Page 44

Out of the Box

by: Rebecca Boles
Architect: Hahnfeld Hoffer Stanford; Ellerbe Becket

The expanding curricula at Texas Christian University has generated the need for new buildings. As new programs have been added, TCU has been consistently infilling the campus master plan, adding approximately 600,000 square feet of new construction since 1996. Steve and Sarah Smith Entrepreneurs Hall, completed in February 2003, represents the second joint venture at TCU between design architect Ellerbe Becket and architect-of-record Hahnfeld Hoffer Stanford. The team also produced TCU’s Tucker Technology Center the year before.

Chad Davis
Page 48

Mansfield Timberview High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Huckabee & Associates, Inc.

Completed in May 2004, Mansfield Timberview High School received awards in the value, design, and educational appropriateness categories in the 2005 Exhibit of School Architecture. Huckabee & Associates designed the 420,000-sf campus using cost-effective building solutions to minimize maintenance expenses for the life of the campus structures, including a total masonry system and terrazzo floors.

Paul Chaplo
Page 62

Excerpt from the Attorney General’s Opinion

Re: Whether a professional engineer may prepare all plans and specifications for a public building described in Occupations Code section 1051.703(a) without engaging the services of a licensed architect

Page 8

Kraus Among AIA’s 2006 ‘Young Architects’

Shannon Kraus, AIA, of Dallas is among the six recipients of the 2006 AIA Young Architects Award, the annual recognition of professionals who have been licensed 10 years or fewer regardless of their age. This award honors individuals who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession early in their careers.

Page 14

Framing Publics

Framing Publics is a proposal for a newspaper’s broadcasting station located in New York City’s Bryant Park. Designed by Cathlyn Newell and Judson Moore, graduate students at Rice University’s School of Architecture, the project simultaneously constructs and supports two different kinds of “publics”—the physical area within the park and the virtual realm of broadcast news.

Page 16

Art League Houston School

The Art League Houston is raising $1 million to build a new Art League Houston School, designed by Irving Phillips, as well as to make improvements to the site and an existing gallery building. Located on Montrose Boulevard in Houston, the new school (its western elevation is shown here), will encompass 6,000 square feet. Site improvements are to include courtyard expansion, more suitable lighting, landscaping, and seating.

Page 16

An Investment in Texas’ Future

by: Sharon Fleming, Debbi Head

Never before has a state government supported the preservation of an entire building type, but the county courthouses of Texas are unique. Texas has more than 230 historic county courthouses—more than any other state. Not only do they stand as monuments to democracy and community pride, the majority are functioning centers of government and archival repositories for public records.

Courtesy Texas Historical Commission
Page 44

History In the Cards

by: Agnes Warren Barnes

The first recollection I have of being interested in postcards was being sick and sitting on my bed looking at my parents’ old linen cards. Later in life, when my husband was working on his stamp collection, I became interested in the postcards he had in his stamp library. This quickly turned into a hobby for me.

Page 56

Nature of a Movement

by: Stephen Sharpe

Call it boldly ambitious or utterly absurd, but the AIA’s Board has set 2010 as the goal for cutting in half the amount of fossil fuels used to construct and operate buildings in the U.S. While proponents prefer to describe the initiative as aggressive, they hasten to point out that radical measures are absolutely essential to forestall the continued warming of the planet’s atmosphere.

Page 5

Stabilization Project Begins On Ruins of Adobe Church

by: Stephen Sharpe

One of its two mud-brick towers already has crumbled into a heap of rubble, and the remaining adobe walls of its nave and surviving tower are in danger of imminent collapse. But the ruins of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ Church still exhibit the impressive arched doorways that inspire admirers of adobe construction to venture far off the beaten path to this tiny borderland hamlet 30 miles upstream along the Rio Grande from Presidio.

Photo by Richard Payne, FAIA , courtesy THC
Page 10

New USGBC Chapter Totals 3 for Texas

Last summer the U.S. Green Building Council incorporated its third and newest chapter in Texas. The Central Texas-Balcones Chapter joined two others – the North Texas and Greater Houston Area chapters – to represent the state on the USGBC’ board of directors.

Page 12

AIA Austin Awards Eleven Projects

AIA Austin honored 11 projects during the chapter’s 2006 Awards and Honors Gala held on Feb.25 at the Seaholm Power Plant. The projects were selected from a pool of 69 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 14

At Home Along the Flyway

by: Karen Hastings
Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

Just outside Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park in Mission – a rare oasis of wild riparian woodland in the widely cultivated Lower Rio Grande Valley – the new World Birding Center headquarters and visitors’ center sits on 60 acres where onions were once farmed. The park attracts many types of feathered travelers, as well as other winged nomads. However, the two prevailing species seem to be bird-watchers and butterfly-watchers, both varieties outfitted with wide-brimmed hats, digital cameras, and binoculars.

Paul Hester
Page 30

World Birding Center

More than 500 species of birds, with the river woodlands and thorny brushland that shelters them, are star attractions of the World Birding Center in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of South Texas. More than one place, much less a single building, the center was conceived as a collection of nine independent nature preserves, stretching from the beaches of South Padre Island to the thorny hills of Starr County.

Page 34

Healthful Hospitality

by: Nestor Ifanzon
Architect: Page Southerland Page

The new Baylor Regional Medical Center is one of those institutional facilities that challenges visitors to peel away its layers for a better appreciation of the project and its context. To fully appreciate the building requires an understanding of the combination of factors that led to its conception, specifically those related to statistics that forebode a healthcare crisis in Texas. Among those factors are the rapidly expanding growth of the state’s major cities and the large number of aging baby boo

Craig Blackmon, FAIA; Yunjoo Namkoong
Page 36

Garland ISD Special Events Center

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: HKS, Inc.

In designing the Garland ISD Special Events Center, HKS architect Dan Phillips aimed to create a non-traditional structure that would provide an energetic space for school and community events. As a result, the distinctively designed assembly and conferencing center, opened in August 2005, looks more like a state-of-the-art performance hall than a typical school field house.

Blake Marvin
Page 48

Irresponsible Claims

by: James B. Atkins, Grant A. Simpson

Claims against architects are often written in a way to try to take advantage of a particular state law, or to put the design professional in as unflattering position as possible. The following examples are styled after actual claims filed against design professionals, and they are typical of what a design professional may expect if an owner unhappy with the quality of the work claims the architect should pay all or a portion of the cost of remedying nonconforming work.

Page 56

Prospect and Refuge

by: Justin Allen Howard

Architecture is the practice of optimism in the face of the destructive powers of nature and man. It is a defiant standing of ground between the whim of nature and the will of man. Architects seek to design places of meaning and permanence, but we are constantly reminded of the forces at work against the built environment.

Page 64

‘Green’ Renewal

by: Stephen Sharpe

Albiet tangential to this edition’s “Color” theme, the profession’s achievements in sustainable design deserve to be acknowledged at every opportunity. The fact that three of the AIA Committee on the Environment’s Top Ten Green Projects are in Texas demonstrates how the state’s architects are successfully responding to their clients’ desire for buildings that minimize environmental impact and maximize the energy-efficient attributes of high-performance design.

Steve Hudson Courtesy W.O. Neuhaus Architects
Page 5

Taniguchi Set to Unveil Revised Design this Summer for Asia House Houston

by: Ronnie Self

Yoshio Taniguchi, best known in the U.S. for his recent expansion of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, will unveil his latest schematic design for Houston’s Asia House later this summer. The client, Asia Society Texas, has acquired two facing parcels totaling 78,000 square feet along one block of Southmore Boulevard between Caroline and Austin streets in the city’s Museum District. The 35,000-sq. ft. facility is expected to open in summer 2009 and will serve as a venue for cultural, artistic, educational, and business exchange.

courtesy asia society texas
Page 10

AIA Houston Presents Design Awards

AIA Houston recognized 15 projects in the chapter’s 2006 Design Awards. The jury – Margaret Helfand of Helfand Architecture; Steve Cassell of Architecture Research Office; Zack McKown of Tsao & McKown Architects; and Rob Rogers of Rogers Marvel Architects – selected the winners from 113 submittals.

Page 14

Girl Scout Leadership Center

The Sally Cheever Girl Scout Leadership Center, designed by Marmon Mok, will be a 30,000-sq. ft. regional headquarters serving Girl Scouts in the San Antonio area and nine surrounding counties. The wooded seven-acre site just north of San Antonio International Airport offered the architect the opportunity to embrace the spirit of the Girl Scouts by taking a “nature in the city” approach that has resulted in several environmental-friendly attributes, including rainwater collection, hiking paths, and native landscaping.

Page 16

Rural Fabric

by: Liz Axford

When asked about sources of inspiration for The Quilts of Gee’s Bend, which debuted at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston in the fall of 2002, the quiltmakers often cited their surroundings. In the current exhibit, Gee’s Bend: The Architecture of the Quilt, debuting once again at the MFAH, the curators have worked to make this connection more apparent.

Illustrations courtesy MFAH
Page 20

Playing It Up

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Upchurch Architects

The recently completed Day School for Christ Lutheran Church in Brenham puts a new face on school design for this small city Northwest of Houston. Previously occupying a small house and shared weekday use of a rather bleak set of Sunday School rooms, 125 children (with their 24 teachers) now occupy a building Upchurch Architects has designed just for them.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 32

Cool Spaces

by: Frank Jacobus
Architect: Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects; Goetting & Associates; Jaster-Quintanilla (joint venture)

The 2002 expansion of the Austin Convention Center, a near doubling of the facility’s size, as well as the concurrent construction of a new convention center hotel, prompted city officials to consider an important question: Where will all those additional people park? Ultimately, the officials decided on a project that paired the city’s Convention Center Department and Austin Energy, the municipal electrical utility, and created 650-plus parking spaces while also providing chilled water for downtown customers.

Thomas McConnell
Page 36

NorthPark Center Expansion

by: Jennifer Lee
Architect: Omniplan Inc.

The recent expansion of NorthPark Center in Dallas by Omniplan represents the second major alteration of the innovative 1964 shopping mall. Originally developed by Raymond D. Nasher in an L-shaped plan, NorthPark has been reconfigured as a closed square with double the amount of retail space.

James F. Wilson
Page 45

New Trends in Walls and Ceilings

by: TA Staff

New technologies are offering architects and designers further innovative solutions to increase their projects’ overall value through operational efficiency and long-term maintenance. These range from improved materials to enhanced techniques for their application.

Courtesy Page Southerland Page; Courtesy baker drywall; craig blackmon, faia; Courtesy aker-zvonkovic photography; Courtesy Panel specialists inc.; Courtesy alamo architects
Page 49

Rehab of Historic ‘Rock Ranch’ Recognized by Preservationists

by: J. Brantley Hightower

In his essay “The Necessity for Ruins,” J.B. Jackson writes of the importance of an “interval of neglect” in the history of a built object or landscape. “Ruins,” he notes, “provide the incentive for restoration, and for a return to origins.” While the old adage – we only miss things once they are gone – may very well be true, Jackson proposes that we also can appreciate things while they are here and take action before those things are lost forever.

Photos courtesy Steph en B. Cha mbers, AIA
Page 12

Houstonians Rally to Preserve Theaters

by: Gerald Moorhead

When the Greater Houston Preservation Alliance (GHPA) added two Art Deco theaters to its “most endangered” list in July, there was an unprecedented outcry to save the buildings from being razed. The response has been unique for Houston, where land value is king and buildings, the bearers of history and identity-of-place, are expendable. Within 10 days, more than 20,000 people had signed an online petition in support of GHPA’s actions to preserve the theaters.

Photos by gerald moorhead, fAIA
Page 15

Design Awards 2006

by: Michael Malone

Architects rarely have the opportunity to view the best work of their peers from around the state, so the TS A Design Awards’ jury review offers a unique vantage point. The event is much like a window from which to see the diversity of scope, scale, and issues our fellow professionals are working with. Sitting in while the jury meets is exciting. It also can be a humbling experience and, at moments, distressing when projects you believe have merit are summarily rejected.

staff photos
Page 30

2006 Design Awards Jury

by: Michael Malone

This year’s jury was exceptional in a number of ways—particularly for its regional diversity (Boston, New York City, and Baton Rouge) and the sheer number of awards its three jurors have amassed for design (more than 150 among them). Also notable to anyone observing the jurors working together was their commitment to rewarding excellence through careful review and consensus. Shown from left to right, the jurors were:

Page 31

Commerce Street Townhomes


Architect: Ron Wommack, FAIA

The eight-unit, inner-city townhouse project is located on a long-abandoned site in a former manufacturing area east of downtown Dallas. Two industrial structures across the street had been renovated into residential dwellings, and this project forms another street wall to bring scale and intimacy to this neighborhood.

Charles Smith
Page 38

Floating Box House


Architect: Peter L Gluck and Partners, Architects

Surrounded by a grove of more than 200 live oaks, the house is located just outside Austin and stands between the city’s new urban skyline and its rural past.

Paul Warchol
Page 48
View: 25 50 100 All