Article Results for "Media"

An Honest Frame Members Only

by: Matt Fajkus, AIA

Situated in the Hill Country, Max Levy’s newly completed Prospect House acts as a mediator between the scale of the human and the vastness of nature, writes contributor Matt Fajkus, AIA.

Max Levy, AIA
Page 72

Preservation Texas Honor Awards

Award winners announced for the 2013 Preservation Texas Honor Awards.

Page 19

Boat Dock

Alterstudio Architecture’s boat dock on Lake Austin embraces the long views of the water and landscape, but screens the immediacy of the speedboats from backyard barbecuers.

Page 25

Texas Society of Architects Honor Awards

The Texas Society of Architects announces the recipients of our 2013 Honor Awards.

Page 29

What Starts Here…

by: Brantley Hightower, AIA

Even an Aggie would have to admit that The University of Texas at Austin has an impressive campus. Three new buildings: Belo Center for New Media, Norman Hackerman Building, and the College of Liberal Arts Building push the envelope and interpret design guidelines in creative ways.

PHOTO BY TOM BONNER. PHOTOS OF THE BELO CENTER BY S.FRANCES. PHOTO OF THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS BY DROR BALDINGER.
UT AUSTIN MASTER PLAN BY SASAKI ASSOCIATES. COURTSEY PAGESOUTHERLANDPAGE.
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AIA LRGV Studio Awards

by: TA Staff

Two awards were presented by AIA Lower Rio Grande Valley in the chapter’s 2011 Studio Awards program. Carolina Civarolo, AIA, of Boultinghouse Simpson Architects in McAllen, received the Spark Award for Digital Media for the proposed renovation and expansion of the University of Texas–Pan American’s College of Business Administration in Edinburg. Ortiz Architecture & Environment in Weslaco was recognized with a Design Award for an Unbuilt
Project for its Weslaco Family Care Center & Occupational Medicine Clinic.

Page 16

BioScience Research Collaborative at Rice University

by: Jason T. Chan, AIA

At the intersection of Rice University’s historic and growth axes is the BioScience Research Collaborative, a ten-story 477,000-sf translational research facility designed to facilitate multi-institutional research collaboration between Rice and various institutes from Texas Medical Center. This interdisciplinary facility embraces a wide range of disciplines, from chemistry to bioengineering, from organizations supporting startup research companies to the National Space Biomedical Research Institute — all with emphasis on improving human wellness through research.

Cesar Rubio Photography
Page 66

Honored Heritage

by: Anna Mod
Architect: Smith & Company Architects

The African American Library at the Gregory School is located in a former elementary school building in Houston’s Fourth Ward neighborhood immediately west of downtown. The two-story concrete-frame, brick-veneer Classical Revival-style building is a designated State of Texas Landmark, City of Houston Protected Landmark, and is located within the Freedmen’s Town National Register Historic District.

Gary Zvonkovic
Page 57

Out of Context

by: Stephen Sharpe

With hurricane Katrina bearing down on t he Louisiana shoreline six years ago, New Orleans native Daniel Samuels, AIA, and his extended family hurriedly joined the late-evening exodus slowly snaking westward along Interstate 10. Samuels, an architect then 46 years old with a wife and two small daughters, had no clear plan for the immediate future other than to evade next morning’s monstrous landfall.

Istock/Whirler
Page 7

Thin Living

The problem posed by visiting assistant professor Jeffrey S. Nesbit in his third-year design studio at Texas Tech called for a slender mixed-use tower to be built on a 450-sf lot in downtown Philadelphia immediately adjacent to an abandoned movie theater.

Page 23

Blog of an Architect

by: Bob Borson, AIA

Last may, the number of websites was expected to exceed 324 million. That’s a lot of competition for architects who want their message heard. A more focused alternative is to create a blog and use social media to reach your target audience. The key word is “social” because it allows for an interactive dialogue between two or more people who share a common interest.

Page 124

Back to the Garden

by: Rebecca Boles, AIA

The prairie has returned to Fort Worth’s Cultural District. Evicted long ago by urbanization, native flora have again taken root along University Drive where revived grassland heralds the emergence of a unique enterprise. So surprising is the sight of children at play in this field of prairie grasses that one may not immediately see the new building on the site.

Chris Cooper
Page 48

Changing Course

by: Scott Wilson
Architect: SHW Group

At first sight , approaching the school from around a stand of mature trees, all preserved through careful planning, visitors immediately feel a dynamic presence. The mosaic of juxtaposed masonry, concrete, and cantilevered metal and glass elements hints at a complex collaboration lying within the two-story Career and Technical Education (CTE) Center in Frisco. In only its second academic year and under the continued, enthusiastic leadership of Dr. Wes Cunningham, the CTE Center appears to be setting the bar higher for the design of public schools.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers; Terry Wier Architectural Photography; Paul Bardagjy
Page 54

Belo Center for New Media

Following a competition among 15 firms, a new 120,000-sf Belo Center for New Media is being designed by Lawrence Group Architects for the University of Texas at Austin. Serving as a northwest gateway to the campus, the building will expand facilities for the College of Communication.

Page 24

Second Act

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Boora Architects; CCS & H

The 3,000-seat Nancy Lee and Perry R. Bass Concert Hall is the flagship theater of the University of Texas at Austin’s performing arts complex. Originally opened in 1981, the hall boasted an unusually large stage and generous back-of-house areas that effectively accommodated large-scale opera and dance productions. However, following the adoption in 1999 of more stringent campus-wide fire and life safety standards, the university hired Boora Architects of Portland, Oregon, to study remedial options.

Park Street; Len Allington
Page 52

Resolute Landmark

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: CamargoCopeland Architects and Overland Partners

Also dotting the landscape are landmarks from a grander but almost forgotten earlier era—including the Masonic Temple (1941; Flint & Broad), the Weisfeld Center (1912; Hubbell & Greene; originally the First Church of Christ, Scientist), and the Scottish Rite Cathedral (1913; Hubbell & Greene). Dallas City Hall, designed in 1977 by I.M. Pei with the mission of awakening Dallas from its post- JFK assassination slump, mediates between this neglected corner of downtown and the inner city’s robust commercial district. There is hope, however, for this neighborhood’s renewal since the opening in 2008 of The Bridge, a homeless assistance center funded by the City of Dallas.

Charles David Smith
Page 42

NE Texas Awards Six Projects

by: TA Staff

Six projects by members of AIA Northeast Texas were recognized in the chapter’s 2010 Design Awards program. Jurors viewed a total of 15 entries before making their selections on Oct. 14 at the Center for Architecture in San Antonio.

Page 25

Stylized Urbanism

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: HOK with Laguarda Low Architects

At first blush, Houston Pavilions seems the type of urban in-fill project that provokes architectural deliberation due in part to its formulaic response to current market conditions—a major mixed-use complex in the central business district. Conventional wisdom (supported by favorable coverage in popular media) tells us that almost any large project in nearly any CBD must be a good thing.

Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 48

Cibolo Town Center

The Cibolo Town Center Master Plan, designed by Archimedia, was developed over several months in a series of stakeholder charrettes and city leadership meetings. Located just four miles off I-35 northeast of San Antonio, Cibolo must adapt to rapid growth.

Page 22

Dallas Convention Center Hotel

In March, demolition and soil remediation began on the future site of the Dallas Convention Center Hotel, designed by Dallas architectural firm 5Gstudio_collaborative with BOKA Powell as the architect of record.

Page 22

Concrete Poetry

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: Elliott + Associates Architects

This word painting by Rand Elliott, FAIA, explains how he wants people to understand his latest award-winning project, ImageNet of Houston. Employing poetry or manifestoes to describe one’s work is not uncommon these days. Indeed, such material appears to be a prerequisite of the current media culture that promotes “starchitects,” “signature architects,” and one-hit wonders. Supportive text is, we are led to believe, required reading. If a building appears mundane, baffling, or otherwise underwhelming, just refer to the narrative. Within the architect’s words, we are told, lies the true meaning which will assure in our prosaic times that, yes, this is Architecture.

Scott McDonald, Hedrich Blessing; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 56

Texas Dance Halls Among Annual ‘Most Endangered Historic Places’

In its 2008 list of the state’s most endangered historic places, Preservation Texas has called for immediate action to save hundreds of traditional community dance halls threatened by neglect and suburban sprawl. Many of the historic dance halls, once mainstays in sustaining the cultural heritage of immigrant communities, have been converted for other uses or abandoned, according to the group.

Image Courtesy Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Buildings Survey, HABS TEX,8-CASP ,1-
Page 16

A City’s Vision Becomes Reality

by: Stephen Sharpe

As reported on the following pages, One Arts Plaza represents the first major commercial venture to open for some time in the Dallas Arts District. Construction continues to swirl around the new project, designed by Morrison Seifert Murphy, as crews work on several significant buildings immediately adjacent to its site. One Arts Plaza, shown at the far left in the rendering provided by the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts, is set at the northeast end of Flora Street that bisects the Arts District. At the street’s other terminus is the Dallas Museum of Art, which, since the Edward Larrabee Barnes-designed complex opened in 1984, has been joined by neighboring cultural venues designed by other highly renowned architects.

Winspear Opera House and Annette Strauss Artist Square Renderings courtesy Foster + Partners; Wyly Theatre And Performance Park Renderings Courtesy Luxigon; Dallas Arts District Rendering Courtesy Dallas Center for the Performing Arts
Page 24

Cultural Monument

by: Edward Burian
Architect: CasaBella Architects + Del Campo & Maru

The recently completed first phase of the Mexican American Cultural Center (MACC) for the Cultural Affairs Division of the City of Austin’s Parks and Recreation Department is dedicated to the creation, preservation, presentation, and promotion of Mexican-American cultural arts and heritage. Envisioned as a resource both for the local community and visitors through education and community participation, the center focuses on fostering an understanding and appreciation of Hispanic culture, as well as ambitiously featuring indigenous cultures of Americas. The programs and educational curriculum at the MACC includes the visual arts, theater, dance, literature, music, multi-media, and the culinary arts.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 52

Gauging Green

by: Lars Stanley, AIA and Lauren Woodward Stanley, AIA

t a time when our nation’s financial system seems to be imploding, it’s sometimes distressing to ponder what the future holds for the architectural profession. Our livelihoods are inextricably tied to the fortunes of the building industry, which quickly reacts to any economic downturn and in turn affects our work accordingly. Troubling, too, is the issue of global warming because our profession has an immediate and direct impact on the environment. And considering that buildings in the U.S. consume about 70 percent of the nation’s total electricity output and 12 percent of its water, it is evident that what we do as designers and builders in the future must be increasingly responsive to such grave issues.

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