Article Results for "Practice"

Innovation and Design

by: Catherine Gavin

Digital fabrication is turning traditional architectural practice on its head, and as academics press forward into uncharted territories, communication and cross-pollination with practicing architects is increasingly important.

Page 7

Tiltwallism: A Treatise on the Architectural Potential of Tiltwall Construction

by: Mitch Bloomquist, Assoc. AIA

Are tilt-walls the solution to the problem of architects’ disengagement with the most common forms of construction? Author Jeffrey Brown, AIA, offers a primer on tilt-up construction and a critique of its absence from serious architectural practice.

Page 12

Small Stuff

by: Ben Koush

Digital fabrication techniques have allowed three up-and-coming Texas firms to experiment with new, small-scale forms — but experience shows that technology only goes so far. Expertise and craft remain critical elements of architectural practice.

Page 54

White on White

by: Jen Wong

Baldridge Architects’ new office, a study in precision-built minimalism, offers a counterintuitive take on design-build in practice.

Casey Dunn and Elaine Shen
Page 66

Amarillo Museum of Art Biennial 600 – Sculpture Members Only

by: Leigh A. Arnold

The Amarillo Museum of Art (AMoA) debuts Biennial 600 — the sixth in an ongoing series of juried biennial exhibitions that explore specific areas of artistic practice through a particular material.

Page 22

AIA Dallas 2013 Firm of the Year

Michael Malone Architects has been selected by AIA Dallas as the recipient of its 2013 Firm Award. The firm is being recognized for fostering a culture of commitment to the design community through its practice, publication, and professional involvement.

Page 23

(Almost) All-American House

by: Stephen Fox
Architect: Karen Lantz, AIA

With the (Almost) All-American Home, Lantz Full Circle was determined to pursue the project as an exercise in the way architecture ought to be practiced.

Lantz Full Circle, Paul Hester, Jack Thompson Photography
Page 46

My Beautiful City Austin

by: David Heymann, FAIA

David Heymann, FAIA, talks about Austin’s laid-back lifestyle and why he moved here to practice architecture.

Page 11

Ephemeral Practices

by: Paul M. Dennehy, AIA

Each year, Fort Worth AIA sponsors a sketching program, which has resulted in a rich collection of little black books.

Page 35

...with Clovis Heimsath, FAIA

by: Lawrence Connolly, AIA

Although, keeping up with him has never been easy, Clovis Heimsath, FAIA, is a testament to architecture being a calling and not a profession — his practice and his lifestyle are seamless.

Julie Pizzo Wood
Page 60

Conference Emphasizes Practice in the Hinterlands

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA

For two days in February, a group of designers gathered in Midland to consider the challenges of producing top-flight architecture in a place far removed from the state’s larger urban areas. The event, dubbed “Architecture in the Hinterlands,” included an address by acclaimed Canadian architect Brian MacKay-Lyons that featured his work in remote Nova Scotia.

Thomas McConnell
Page 15

Military Hospital Addition

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio has served the medical needs of men and women in uniform since the 1870s. During that time, the complex grew incrementally until 1995 when a new facility was built to consolidate the Fort’s hospital operations. Containing over a million square feet of space, the massive Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC – pronounced “Bam-See”) was clad in heavy masonry that gave it a somewhat institutional quality. While BAMC was functional, the needs of contemporary combat medical practice are constantly evolving and when the decision was made to absorb most of the operations of a nearby Air Force medical facility into the complex, a significant expansion became necessary to create what would eventually be known as the San Antonio Military Medical Center.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 74

...with Laura Culpepper, AIA

by: Aaron Seward

From the outside, there is little to suggest that the two-story traditional house nestled among pine trees at the end of a county road in Nacogdoches is home to a thriving architectural practice. But there’s little to suggest it on the inside either.

Julie Pizzo
Page 93

Texas Architects Convention Offers ARE Study Classes

The Texas Society of Architects and AIA Austin are offering three specialized study classes on the Architect Registration Examination (ARE) during the Texas Architects 73rd Annual Convention and Design Expo, Oct. 18-20, in Austin. The classes are “Tips and Tricks for using the NCARB Practice Software”; “Archibowl - Come on Down!”; and “NCARB and You: IDP, ARE, and Certification.”

Page 119

Architects Encouraged to Participate in Advocates for Architecture Day

Texas Architects’ second annual Advocates for Architecture Day (AAD) — considered to be the next “best chance” members have to market their profession and protect their practice — is scheduled for January 29.

Thomas Mc Connell
Page 8

Outstanding Intern Programs in Texas

by: Rebecca Boles

Many discussions about the practice of architecture end with the conclusion that architectural interns aren’t what they used to be. Well, that’s true: some of today’s emerging professionals are better trained because of improvements to the AIA’s Intern Development Program (IDP).

FK Architects, English + Associates Architects
Page 28

IT Infrastructure

by: John Jankowski

There was a time, not terribly long ago, when the telecommunications industry spoke of “convergence.” Voice and data would soon be one, and the complexity that goes with building and maintaining separate systems would evaporate. That time is upon us; actually, it has been for years. Why, then, is building the corporate information technology infrastructure still so complicated?

Page 78

The Work, Part I: The Contractor’s Work Plan

by: James B. Atkins, Grant A. Simpson

This two-part series will take a look at the contractor’s sole responsibility for the Work and how to evaluate the contractor’s approach to its supervision, coordination, and direction. Part 1 examines the planning that is logically and often contractually required, including the primary organizational framework—the Contractor’s Work Plan.

Overland Partners, DIS Engineering
Page 79

Notes on the Jury

by: Michael Malone, AIA

On May 20, the 2011 design awards jury met to review the 257 entries submitted in this year’s program. The distinguished jury consisted of three exceptional professionals with diverse practice and professional experiences, along with a considerable love of architecture and design.

Photos By Julie Pizzo
Page 38

The Work, Part II: Contract Obligations and Options

by: James B. Atkins, Grant A. Simpson

As we observed in Part I (published in the previous edition) of this two-part series, the term “the Work” in the construction contract comprises more than labor and materials. In fact, the success of a project relies heavily on the contractor’s ability to plan, coordinate, and execute the means, methods, techniques, sequences, and procedures required to put the Work in place. This is not a new concept. Ten Books on Architecture, written by Marcus Vitruvius Pollio in 30 BC for Roman Emperor Augustus, emphasizes planning as being integral to good building construction. In Part I we identified many of the components of the contractor’s Work Plan. We referred to several available resources and pointed out various indicators to look for as one administers the construction contract, including how to tell if a plan is in the works. In Part II we take the next step to examine alternatives and actions to take if there is a weak or nonexistent plan, including a look at efforts by some contractors to manipulate work scope to avoid conformance. We will conclude with a successful case study followed by suggestions for managing the risks and liabilities that so often arise when the Work is not properly planned or managed.

Page 98

What Comprises a Work Plan?

The elements of a Work Plan can vary based on the contractor’s expertise and approach, but the minimum services and components required of the contractor can be found in the AIA General Conditions, which include:

Page 99

Who’s Responsible for the Work?

In its capacity as supervisor, coordinator, and director of the Work, the contractor must obviously develop and implement a reasonable and prudent plan for organizing, phasing, coordinating, scheduling, and implementing the Work.

Page 102

The Many Shades of Green

by: Duncan T. Fulton FAIA

There are many ways for a building to be “green.” While LEED may be the best known, it is by no means the only way, nor necessarily
always the best.

Page 76

Arlington Re-Imagined

by: Susan Appleton

One year after her course, The Everyday City, was recognized with an AIA Education Honor Award, University of Texas at Arlington Assistant Professor Wanda Dye has tasked her architecture students with improving the everyday life of all Arlington residents. Through collaboration with City of Arlington staff, their work is a natural extension of the investigations they undertook for The Everyday City. In that class, Dye asked them to re-imagine the most mundane and banal aspects of the suburban environment.

City of Arlington Urban Design Center, Andrew Oxley, Carlos Sierra
Page 31

12 Strategies for Increased Competitiveness

by: Joe M. Powell

Predicting the future, no matter how much data you have, is a dicey proposition. Nonetheless, Rice University Building Institute’s work in this area would be largely useless if we couldn’t provide insight into how future market leaders are likely to acquire prominence.

Page 67
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