Article Results for "TAC"

Urban Ecologies

by: Catherine Gavin

With its stacked interchanges and sweeping flyovers, Texas has no shortage roadway feats, yet they often represent barriers for connectivity. Urban designers across the state are rethinking these roadways and using green infrastructure to reconnect downtown districts.

Page 9

Place Matters

by: Michael Friebele, Assoc. AIA

With Gurley Place — an affordable senior housing development located across the street from Jubilee Park in Dallas — buildingcommunityWORKSHOP recognized the significance of community engagement as a way of maintaining one of the most intact, early twentieth-century neighborhoods in the city and responding to the dire need for housing.

Nicole Mlaker; Neil Hacker
Page 46

Design and Full Circles

by: Larry Paul Fuller

First things first. Regular readers of this magazine will notice that the name attached to this column is not the same as the one appearing here for almost 12 years now. Indeed, the tenure of Stephen Sharpe as editor of Texas Architect has come to an end — as even good things must do.

Julie Pizzo
Page 5

Bungalow Modern

by: Canan Yetmen

In Austin’s richly diverse and energetic East Side neighborhoods, a rebirth is taking place. The addition of the Heywood Hotel on East Cesar Chavez Street represents the latest addition to a burgeoning and thriving East Side culture. Nestled comfortably among the barbecue joints, tacquerias and local shops that have so far eluded big-box homogenization, the hotel builds respectfully on the neighborhood’s considerable charms.

Casey Dunn
Page 60

... with Bill Wilson, FAIA

by: Laura N. Bennett, AIA

On the evening of Tuesday, July 31, 2012, a modest gathering of Bill Wilson supporters met at the Butter Churn Restaurant in Sinton to discover the results of a hard-fought Republican primary runoff election for the Texas Representative District 43 seat. After a long day at the office, I hopped in my car and sped to Sinton to join my colleague on this important night.

Julie Pizzo Wood, David Keith
Page 65

1810 Bermuda

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Ron Wommack Architect

When Dee Mitchell first contacted Ron Wommack, FAIA, about the possibility of designing his new house, Mitchell said he intended to interview five architects and visit with each of them three times before deciding which one would get the commission. Later, when he called to tell Wommack he had the job, Mitchell offered that he so enjoyed visiting with him that he didn’t want the conversation to end.

Charles David Smith
Page 26

An Urban ‘Setting for People’

by: Kevin Sloan

With the opening of the spectacular AT &T Performing Arts Center still ringing in the air, the City of Dallas dedicated an urban park in November that is equally bold for different reasons. Known as the Main Street Garden, the 1.7-acre park did not emanate from a Pritzker Prize-winning architect, nor does it flaunt any enthusiasms for Pritzker Prize-like experimentation. Designed by Thomas Balsley and Associates of New York City, the park is intended to be a richly active urban space for downtown residents—a “setting for people,” in the words of its landscape architect.

Willis Winters, Thomas Balsley and Associates
Page 28

Reprise of a Classic

by: Anna Mod
Architect: Stern and Bucek Architects

Schulenburg, situated about 100 miles west of Houston along Interstate 10, was founded in 1873 after Louis Schulenburg donated land surrounding the planned Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio Railway. Typical of late-nineteenth-century railroad towns, Schulenburg developed a wide commercial street lined with several blocks of one- and two-story masonry buildings facing the tracks. Architecturally, the downtown is still intact today although only a few businesses remain open due to the routine exodus for the nearby highway.

Hest + Hardaway
Page 60

Defense Redesigned

by: Steven Land Tillotson

British historian Arnold J. Toynbee observed that the border of an enlightened and ascendant civilization is a fluid zone of contact. But, he cautioned, when its power of self-determination and its creative influence upon neighbors wane so does the mutual cooperation and communication shared with those neighbors until hostility transforms the border into a rigid military line.

Page 26

Intentional Grounding

by: Stephen Sharpe

Texas St adium collapsed on April 11 in a well-executed implosion detonated at 7:08 a.m. that ended a storied 37-year career as the home of the Dallas Cowboys. In less than 30 seconds and before more than 20,000 witnesses, a spectacular series of blasts from 2,715 lbs. of explosives reduced the 65,675-seat arena to rubble.

The City of Irving
Page 68

Chipperfield Chosen for Master Site Plan As Menil Reconsiders Montrose Campus

by: Wendy Price Todd

A generation ago, the Menil Collection revealed an architecturally significant museum housing an extraordinary private art collection in an unspectacular Houston enclave.

the Menil Collection
Page 18

The Art of Deference

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: Kallman, McKinnell & Wood Architects in association with Booziotis & Company Architects

A glimpse through the front doors of the Blanton Museum of Art reveals a soft blue light—it’s the new piece, Stacked Waters, a cast acrylic site-specific installation by artist Teresita Fernández. Wrapping around the walls of the atrium, Stacked Waters suffuses the space with unexpected and atmospheric light against the backdrop of the main stair hall. The effect illustrates how the Blanton is, in many ways, a deferential building— a backdrop not just to art on the inside but to the campus on the outside as well.

Emory Photography; Scott Melcer
Page 56

Legislature Wrap Up: Architects Gain

by: TA Staff

Despite an acrimonious end to the 81st Texas Legislature, architects appear to have gained in matters of practice and lawsuit reform. Other measures expected to be considered by lawmakers were instead left to die on the House floor in the waning days of the session due to a delay tactic intended to quash a politically charged voter ID bill.

Page 19

Self-Contained

by: Ed Soltero, AIA
Architect: Rhotenberry Wellen Architects

When Malcolm McLean devise d the now ubiquitous metal shipping container in the 1950s, his idea transformed the cargo transport business. The movement of goods on a global scale was greatly facilitated by what became known as inter-modal steel building units. Today, as America’s insatiable appetite for goods from China continues to grow and reverse trade with that country stagnates, empty containers continue to stack up at inland freight transit terminals around the U.S. The Chinese do not want them back—it’s cheaper for them to fabricate new ones.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 50

TSA Convention Preview: Exhibitors

The Texas Society of Architects welcomes these companies participating in the 2009 Expo in Houston (current as of August 4). Expo dates are October 23-24 at the George R. Brown Convention Center. Make plans now to visit their booths, pick up new product information, ask a question, or just see a friend. Keep and use this handy guide with booth numbers and contact information as a reference tool.

Page 103

Market Value

by: Geoffry Brune, AIA

In his 2003 analysis of U.S. energy consumption, architect Ed Mazria showed that buildings consume nearly half (48 percent) of domestic energy usage, in both the energy required to operate them and the embodied energy of producing the building materials to construct them. Mazria, the executive director of the 2030 Challenge, also estimates that three-quarters of the nation’s built environment will be either new or renovated by the year 2038. This transformation of the built environment over the next 30 years represents an opportunity to dramatically reduce the building sector’s energy demand.

Photos by Paul Hester
Page 38

Justice Served

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Rees Associates, Inc.

The addition to and renovation of the George Allen Sr. courthouse consolidates all 45 of the Dallas County civil courts, formerly located in three buildings, into one central location. Providing 210,000 square feet of new space, the addition stacks its program with the highest traffic family court spaces on the bottom, served by escalators.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 66

Misfires

RFIs can often be misused. Some examples include: INNAPROPRIATE QUESTIONS An RFI may ask for the size of fasteners to attach sheathing on the building. This is a proprietary issue that is typically determined by the product manufacturer.

Page 68

George Allen Sr. Courthouse

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Rees Associates

The addition to and renovation of the George Allen Sr. Courthouse building consolidates all 45 of the Dallas County civil courts, formerly located in three buildings, into one central location. Providing 210,000 square feet of new pace, the addition stacks its program with the highest traffic family court spaces on the bottom, served by escalators.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 62

Symposium in March at A&M Examines Conservation of Texas’ WWII Heritage

by: David G Woodcock, FAIA

From out of the crucible of violence and heroism known as World War II arose what some call “the greatest generation.” For the soldiers who fought its battles and the civilians who endured its hardships, the effects of that cataclysmic event continue to resonate more than 60 years later. And much like those who experienced the war first-hand, time slowly but inexorably undermines the physical remnants of that global conflict.

courtesy Center for Heritage Conservation
Page 10

Austin City Lofts


Architect: Page Southerland Page

This 82-unit, 14-story tower provides an anchor and landmark for a new mixed-use district in the southwest quadrant of downtown. A three-story, horizontal, stone volume houses the entry lobby, deep stacked porches, and a modest retail strip off a shady arcade. Parking for 164 vehicles is tucked behind and below.

Tim Griffith Photography
Page 34

Bonfire Memorial


Architect: Overland Partners Architects

On Nov. 18, 1999, the 55-foot-tall stack under construction for the annual Bonfire collapsed, killing 12 Texas A&M students and injuring 27 others. The memorial is intended to open outside eyes to a deep, strong spirit and tradition that has united thousands of Aggies.

Frank White Photography
Page 36

Square of Circles


Architect: Jay Smith, AIA

This design was a winning entry in the 2006 Ultimate Tree House design competition held by the Dallas Arboretum (see p. 120). The program required that the tree house be interactive, meet state accessibility requirements, and not attach to the tree.

Page 80

Down By The River

by: Mark T. Wellen
Architect: Chakos Zentner Marcum Architects; Craig Kinney Architects

San Angelo is one of the best-kept secrets of Texas. While it clearly benefits from the bucolic beauty of its location at the northern-most limits of the Hill Country, San Angelo has neither an interstate highway nor a large commercial airport and one can’t help but feel the isolation of its setting in the remote environs of West Texas. Still, some of its architecture is exemplary, including Trost & Trost’s City Hall (1928), Caudill Rowlett and Scott’s Central High School (1955), Ford Powell and Carson’s Central National (1969), and Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer’s San Angelo Museum of Art (1999). The downtown core is largely intact but suffers from underutilization; the restored Fort Concho (1867-69), and the Concho River Valley environs all contribute to a small city ripe with potential.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 36

Handmade Places

by: Jill Nokes

Today, most new residential construction adheres to rules enforced by homeowner associations or deed restrictions that dictate paint colors, plant selections, and maintenance guidelines intended to protect property values. But security, orderliness, and predictability are benefits that come with a price: increasingly generic or homogenous landscapes, less understanding and tolerance of “outsiders,” and even a diminished sense of community and long-term attachment.

Page 60
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