Article Results for "rehabilitation"

Re-Tailoring Retail

by: Aaron Seward

Three projects — Rackspace Hosting (an internet company in the old Windsor Park Mall in San Antonio), the McAllen Public Library (in an old Walmart), and Montgomery Plaza (a condominium in former Mont¬gomery Ward facility in Fort Worth) — offer a cross section of some of the design concerns and sociological effects of rehabilitating abandoned shopping malls.

Lars Frazer Photography, Boultinghouse Simpson Gates Architects; Lara Swimmer Photography, Craig Smith Photography; Shands Photographics
Page 50

Preservation: The Past Meets the Present

by: Catherine Gavin

Courthouse and main street restoration programs are an exciting facet of historic preservation, but they generally represent the more traditional side of the field. This issue explores preservation in the context of rehabilitation, adaptive reuse, and contemporary design, illustrating how these projects can in fact meet prescribed sustainability standards.

Brantley Hightower, AIA
Page 5

Reuse, Recycle, and Reinvent

by: Ben Koush

Studio RED Architects’ rehabilitation of a former warehouse for use as the Houston Permitting Center was centered on rigorously researched sustainability, deference to the industrial character of the old building, and the installation of an intensely local public art program.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers; MN | Photography
Page 48

Johnson Renewed

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

Bodron+Fruit’s careful rehabilitation and restoration of Philip Johnson’s Beck House in Dallas resulted in a livable home that is true to both its historic character and the lifestyle of the new owners.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; David McWilliams
Page 54

A New Wing for the Witte

by: Catherine Gavin

Ford, Powell & Carson’s restoration and rehabilitation of Pioneer Hall transformed the centennial building with a new glassy addition for Witte Museum’s Robert J. and Helen C. Kleberg South Texas Heritage Center.

Dror Baldinger, AIA; Laura Hernandez
Page 60

Award-Winning Rehab Project Saves Formerly ‘Endangered’ Caruth Home

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA

The rehabilitation of the historic Caruth Homeplace – located just west of Central Expressway and south of Northwest Highway – is a landmark achievement for the property’s owner, the Communities Foundation of Texas. By recognizing the project with its 2011 Sense of Place Award, Preservation Dallas has emphasized the significance of this transformation from a derelict building included on its 2007 Most Endangered List to a revitalized architectural treasure.

Photos by Carolyn Brown Courtesy Communities Foundation of Texas
Page 8

The Monterey

by: Catherine Gavin

A former gas station turned gastropub, The Monterey is helping to create a culinary outpost in San Antonio’s Southtown district.

Page 72

Crow Holdings at Old Parkland

by: Michael Malone, AIA

Forlorn and neglected, a romantic near-ruin, the former Parkland Hospital sat abandoned and unused for decades at the junction of the Dallas North Tollway and Oak Lawn Avenue. Passersby could glimpse the distinguished older structures (dating back to 1913) nestled under their sentinel oaks, and be curious about what the buildings’ fate might be.

 Crow Holdings; Good Fulton & Farrell
Page 48

Honored Heritage

by: Anna Mod
Architect: Smith & Company Architects

The African American Library at the Gregory School is located in a former elementary school building in Houston’s Fourth Ward neighborhood immediately west of downtown. The two-story concrete-frame, brick-veneer Classical Revival-style building is a designated State of Texas Landmark, City of Houston Protected Landmark, and is located within the Freedmen’s Town National Register Historic District.

Gary Zvonkovic
Page 57

Center for the Intrepid

by: Susan Butler
Architect: SmithGroup

The 65,000-sf Center for the Intrepid, designed by SmithGroup is equipped with the most sophisticated amputee rehabilitation technology available—virtual reality, robotics, and simulators.

Timothy Hursley
Page 67

Big Spring’s Historic Settles Hotel Seen as Future Mixed-Use Project

by: Lawrence Connolly

The Settles Hotel, a prominent reminder of Big Spring’s prosperity during the oil boom of the late 1920s, still towers over the downtown although abandoned for almost 30 years. Despite several failed attempts within recent years to revive the neglected landmark, the 15-story Neo-Classical/Moderne icon isagain being studied for rehabilitation. This time by a native son who plans to convert the old hotel to commercial and residential mixed-use.

Photo by Anne Read; postcard image courtesy Settles Hotel Development Corporation
Page 13

Design Exploration Center

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: GBA Architecture

Faced wit h the imminent demolition of a World War II-vintage structure adjacent to the University of Houston’s College of Architecture, school officials devised a metamorphosis that not only honors the original building’s utilitarian design but also enhances scholarship on the urban campus.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers
Page 50

Interstate 35 Makeover

Ever since 1962, when construction was completed on Interstate 35 through downtown Austin, the elevated highway effectively bisected the city between a prosperous west and a neglected east. Commissioned by the Downtown Austin Alliance to devise a solution to that perceived division, local firm Cotera + Reed Architects has imagined a permanent installation for a two-block section between Sixth and Eighth streets.

Page 20

Frame/Harper House

by: Ben Koush
Architect: Stern and Bucek Architects

Genius sometimes strikes quickly. According to one of those quintessential Texas stories, architect Harwood Taylor designed his residential masterpiece for childhood friend David Frame and his wife Gloria during a flight from Midland to Houston in Frame’s private plane in 1958.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 48

Vision Restored

by: Ben Heimsath
Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

Clara Driscoll’s spirit looms over Laguna Gloria, her 1916 Mediterranean-style villa set along the banks of the Colorado River in Austin. Though she died in 1945, her personal touch remains palpable throughout the five-story house she and her husband Harry Sevier, a former state legislator, built on 28 acres formerly owned by Stephen F. Austin. The grounds in particular still bear her imprint, featuring landscaping inspired by gardens she had enjoyed while traveling in England and Italy.

Matthew Fuller; courtesy tbg partners
Page 24

‘Green’ Renewal

by: Stephen Sharpe

Albiet tangential to this edition’s “Color” theme, the profession’s achievements in sustainable design deserve to be acknowledged at every opportunity. The fact that three of the AIA Committee on the Environment’s Top Ten Green Projects are in Texas demonstrates how the state’s architects are successfully responding to their clients’ desire for buildings that minimize environmental impact and maximize the energy-efficient attributes of high-performance design.

Steve Hudson Courtesy W.O. Neuhaus Architects
Page 5

Rehab of Historic ‘Rock Ranch’ Recognized by Preservationists

by: J. Brantley Hightower

In his essay “The Necessity for Ruins,” J.B. Jackson writes of the importance of an “interval of neglect” in the history of a built object or landscape. “Ruins,” he notes, “provide the incentive for restoration, and for a return to origins.” While the old adage – we only miss things once they are gone – may very well be true, Jackson proposes that we also can appreciate things while they are here and take action before those things are lost forever.

Photos courtesy Steph en B. Cha mbers, AIA
Page 12

A Grand Space for a Grande River

by: Mario L. Sanchez, PhD

The rehabilitation earlier this year of this small border community’s historic downtown plaza was a significant step towards the recovery of one of Texas’ prime public spaces. The work is part of a multi-phased project designed to re-invigorate Roma’s economy by attracting tourists to this once-thriving town located along the Rio Grande about midway between Laredo and Brownsville.

Courtesy Kell Muñoz, Courtesy Texas Historical Commission, Photo by Chris Cooper
Page 12
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