Architect Results

J. C. Babe , AIA

Assistant Professor of the Practice, Texas A&M University
TAMU 3137
College Station, TX 77843
Phone: (979)690-2595
AIA Brazos Chapter | Member Since: 2009

Robert D. Childers , AIA

Commercial Practice Leader, HKS Inc.
1628 Branard St
Houston, TX 77006
Phone: (713)630-0332
Fax: (713)622-7021
AIA Houston | Member Since: 1998

R. Don Hensley , AIA

Practice Director, Stantec
5717 Legacy Drive
Suite 250
Plano, TX 75024
Phone: (972)539-2184
Fax: (214)473-2401
AIA Fort Worth | Member Since: 1997

Kirk Millican , AIA

Facilities Practice Leader, Freese and Nichols, Inc.
4055 International Plz Ste 200
Fort Worth, TX 76109
Phone: (214)906-0098
AIA Dallas | Member Since: 1980

Nina L. Murrell , AIA

Director of Education Practice, SMRT, Inc

Phone: (512)569-9665
AIA Austin | Member Since: 2000

Firm Results

Website Articles

Healthcare International

WHR, working in collaboration with Arup and KHR Arkitekter, recently won a competition for a new hospital in Denmark. The design combines the best aspects of European and American approaches to healthcare.

April 25, 2016

2016 Convention

The Texas Society of Architects 77th Annual Convention and Design Expo will take place in San Antonio on November 3–5, 2016.

April 08, 2016

BLOG | Texas A&M Students Creating Designs for New Mavericks Facility

Bryan Trubey, FAIA, and Mark Cuban work with graduate architecture students at Texas A&M to design a new practice facility for the Dallas Mavericks.

April 05, 2016

Behind the Scenes

Kendall/Heaton could be the most prominent Texas practice you’ve never heard about. Focusing solely on architect of record services, the firm has completed some of the state’s highest-profile projects, designed by a cast of the world’s most famous architects.

March 28, 2016

BLOG | 2016 Design Conference: Architects Invade Amarillo

Last month, architects from around the state made their way to the Texas Panhandle for the Texas Society of Architect’s Fifth Annual Design Conference. The event explored the relationship between designing and building.

March 02, 2016

Current Magazine Issue

March/April 2016

This issue examines the flow of information and design as it moves in and out of Texas. We learn about a Houston firm that specializes in architect of record services, and we hear from a Fort Worth architect who designed a school for earthquake-ravaged Haiti. We see how local expertise in sports and healthcare facility design is opening some firms up to work around the globe, and we get an update on two projects designed by some of the biggest names in international architecture.

Magazine Cover

Magazine Articles

At the Inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial

by: Ron Stelmarski

Described as the first international survey of contemporary architecture in North America, the biennial looked at the practice through the lens of art.

Steve Hall and Tom Harris
Page 10

Behind the Scenes

by: Ronnie L. Self, AIA

Kendall/Heaton could be the most prominent Texas practice you’ve never heard about. Focusing solely on architect of record services, the firm has completed some of the state’s highest-profile projects, designed by a cast of the world’s most famous architects.

Page 41

Innovation and Design

by: Catherine Gavin

Digital fabrication is turning traditional architectural practice on its head, and as academics press forward into uncharted territories, communication and cross-pollination with practicing architects is increasingly important.

Page 7

Tiltwallism: A Treatise on the Architectural Potential of Tiltwall Construction

by: Mitch Bloomquist, Assoc. AIA

Are tilt-walls the solution to the problem of architects’ disengagement with the most common forms of construction? Author Jeffrey Brown, AIA, offers a primer on tilt-up construction and a critique of its absence from serious architectural practice.

Page 12

Small Stuff

by: Ben Koush

Digital fabrication techniques have allowed three up-and-coming Texas firms to experiment with new, small-scale forms — but experience shows that technology only goes so far. Expertise and craft remain critical elements of architectural practice.

Page 54