Texas Architect March/April 2015

Last year, Dallas accepted the 2014 100 Resilient City Challenge, agreeing to tackle ageing infrastructure, chronic energy shortages, flooding, and terrorism. As a variety of campaigns are encouraging a more holistic approach to architecture that embraces technology under the umbrella of resiliency, this issue looks at how efforts in theory and practice are taking different approaches to the topic.

Edible Architecture

by: Catherine Gavin

Igor Siddiqui and Jen Wong are creating edible architectural materials for Austin’s April Fusebox Festival, thinkEAST Living Charrette to Shape a New Creative Community.

Page 7

Architecture of Space

by: Brantley Hightower, AIA

The story goes that the first word spoken on the surface of another world was the name of a Texas city.

Page 31

Designing for Ageing

by: Ingrid Spencer

While most adults say they would strongly prefer to stay in their homes as they age, many houses and communities in the U.S. are not set up to meet the needs of the elderly and less mobile.

Kimberly Davis
Page 40

A Living Building in North Texas

by: Margaret Sledge, AIA

Lake|Flato Architects' Josey Pavilion aspires to be the first Living Building in Texas.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 56

Raw and Synthetic

by: Bruno Juricic, Gabriel Esquivel, and Stephen Caffey

The Design Research Lab at the Texas A&M University College of Architecture explores resiliency in terms of the raw and synthetic.

Page 62

Waterways

by: Canan Yetmen

For Kathleen English, AIA, of English & Associates, water management is one of the first things she thinks about when approaching a new project.

Jeff Wilson
Page 87

Hill Country Apothecary

MF Architecture has reinvented a strip mall storefront and redefined expectations for drugstores with the Hill Country Apothecary project.

Page 96