Texas Architect January/February 2016

Architects are using data to make a positive impact on building projects. Architects at Page team with other specialists to conduct social research for a new dorm for UT Austin. bcWORKSHOP designs a new Housing First project in Dallas with input from the homeless. Lake|Flato divulges how it stays engaged with its projects post-occupancy. And we take a closer look at the electronic infrastructure that makes Parkland Hospital one of the most advanced buildings of its type in the world.

Letters to the Editor

by: Aaron Seward

Aaron Seward discusses his return to Texas and some of his plans for shaping Texas Architect magazine, including the reintroduction of the letters section.

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At the Inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial

by: Ron Stelmarski

Described as the first international survey of contemporary architecture in North America, the biennial looked at the practice through the lens of art.

Steve Hall and Tom Harris
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Calendar, January–February 2016

Highlights of architecture and cultural happenings around Texas, including San Antonio’s Beaux Arts Ball, Contingent Beauty at MFA Houston, and Moderno at The Blanton.

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A Language of Movement

by: Leigh A. Arnold

Lawrence Halprin and his choreographer wife, Anna, developed a way of notating movement they called “Motation.” Its revelations influenced the design of Fort Worth’s Heritage Park Plaza.

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Social Studies

by: Lawrence W. Speck, FAIA

Aalto’s Baker House dormitory at MIT inspires a study of student housing at UT Austin and a revival of the Modern Movement’s social aspirations.

Casey Dunn Photography
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A Machine for Healing

by: Ron Stelmarski, AIA

The new Parkland Hospital building has been called the world’s first all-digital hospital, a healthcare facility where technology and design merge to improve functionality, lessen the institutional feel, and stay on the cutting edge of advances in medical science.

Assassi Productions
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Poteet Architects’ Poolside Pavilion

The owners of a Victorian home in San Antonio’s historic King Williams neighborhood wanted a little something extra in the backyard.

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