Texas Architect March/April 2016

This issue examines the flow of information and design as it moves in and out of Texas. We learn about a Houston firm that specializes in architect of record services, and we hear from a Fort Worth architect who designed a school for earthquake-ravaged Haiti. We see how local expertise in sports and healthcare facility design is opening some firms up to work around the globe, and we get an update on two projects designed by some of the biggest names in international architecture.

The Prince

by: Aaron Seward

Pritzker Prize-winning architect Alejandro Aravena’s only completed work in the U.S. is a dormitory complex at St. Edward’s University in Austin.

Page 7

Reverse Engineering the Rent: Prototype Housing for Modest Means

by: Jack Murphy, Assoc. AIA

A proposal by Edward M. Baum, FAIA, takes into account the necessities of life in the DFW Metroplex and comes in at a cost of $80/sf.

Page 24

Campsite Rules

by: Aaron Seward
Architect: Charles Di Piazza, AIA & Chris Cobb, AIA

An activist client in Austin’s Heritage Neighborhood commissions an architectural think piece of a house to save a prominent site from the rampant march of stealth dorms.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 32

Behind the Scenes

by: Ronnie L. Self, AIA

Kendall/Heaton could be the most prominent Texas practice you’ve never heard about. Focusing solely on architect of record services, the firm has completed some of the state’s highest-profile projects, designed by a cast of the world’s most famous architects.

Page 41

Healthcare International

by: Florence Tang, Assoc. AIA

WHR, working in collaboration with Arup and KHR Arkitekter, recently won a competition for a new hospital in Denmark. The design combines the best aspects of European and American approaches to health care.

Page 54

For Humanity

by: Tommy Stewart, AIA

Fort Worth architect Tommy Stewart, AIA, designed a school for earthquake-ravaged Haiti, an endeavor he considers to be among the most profound experiences of his life.

Page 61

Intersecting Interests

by: Jen Wong

Artist Robert Irwin’s reconstruction of a hospital at the former Fort D.A. Russell in Marfa dismisses disciplinary boundaries between art, architecture, life, and culture.

Page 76

Bart Shaw Architect’s “Memory: Fairmount Park”

Bart Shaw Architect designs a series of picnic benches for Fort Worth’s Fairmount Park that subtly recall the site’s history.

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