Texas Architect January/February 2006

Published by the Texas Society of Architects since 1950, the magazine has consistently showcased outstanding architectural design from around the state and chronicled significant events relevant to the profession.

Learning Curve

by: Stephen Sharpe

Hyperbolic paraboloids, to say the least, are uncommon on campuses these days. Modernism generally eschews such expressionist gestures. However, featured in this edition are several recent projects that defy the typically staid norm for academia by embodying evocative forms certain to capture attention and provoke thought.

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‘Conversations’ on Texas Modernism

by: Gregory Ibanez

What was it like designing architecture in the International Style in conservative post-war North Texas? What inspired the pioneers of Texas Modernism? How was their work received by their clients and the public? And in what way is it different today? These were a few of the questions pondered during a symposium held Nov. 12 at the University of Texas at Arlington School of Architecture.

Photos by Robert Gries
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Our Border Heritage

by: Stephen Fox

In conjunction with its annual “Building Communities” conference held in October, the Lower Río Grande Valley’s AIA chapter organized a day-long architectural tour that focused on two contrasting settings in remote Starr County.

Photos by Wayne Bell, FAIA.
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Words of Wisdom

Texas Architect posed the question: “What advice would you give to graduating architecture students?” The responses from the practitioners and educators who were asked ranged from the practical to the ideological to the intellectual. The heart of all their messages is to follow one’s heart and trust in intuition when making choices about where to work and in which area to focus.

Paul Hester
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The Brick Wanted to Dance

by: Anna Mod
Architect: RoTo Architects with HKS

“The brick said it wanted to dance,” exclaims Michael Rotondi, FAIA, when asked about the veneer on the new Art and Architecture Building at Prairie View A&M University. Designed by Rotondi’s firm, RoTo Architects in Los Angeles, the 105,000-sf complex adds a dramatic presence to this rural campus located 50 miles west of Houston.

Assassi Productions
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One Hundred Years of Studio

by: Stephen Sharpe

This June marks the centennial of the first graduating class from any school in Texas that taught architecture as a degree program. The degrees in architectural engineering were awarded to three young men at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, now known as Texas A&M University.

courtesy of TAMU College of Architecture
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