Texas Architect January/February 2012

Design for Learning: The featured projects on the following pages attest to recent investments in educational facilities around the state.

Frank Welch, FAIA established a reputation for distinctive design after opening his first office in 1959 in west Texas. He recently completed a memoir, part of which is being published for the first time in this edition. His opening chapter – “Education of an Architect” – starts on page 24.

A New Look

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

No doubt you noticed the makeover of the nameplate on the cover, the most conspicuous of several changes introduced in this edition. The redesigned Texas Architect represents efforts by consultant Dyal and Partners and the magazine’s staff.

Elizabeth Hackler
Page 5

Society Unveils New Brand Identity, Redesigns of Website and Magazine

by: Noelle Heinze

On Oct. 28, during the Texas Society of Architects 72nd Annual Convention in Dallas, 2011 President Dan Hart, AIA, PE, formally announced the Society’s redesigned website and “refreshed” brand, which uphold Texas Architects’ mission to be “the voice for Texas architecture, supporting the creation of safe, beautiful, sustainable environments.”

Page 8

Award-Winning Rehab Project Saves Formerly ‘Endangered’ Caruth Home

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA

The rehabilitation of the historic Caruth Homeplace – located just west of Central Expressway and south of Northwest Highway – is a landmark achievement for the property’s owner, the Communities Foundation of Texas. By recognizing the project with its 2011 Sense of Place Award, Preservation Dallas has emphasized the significance of this transformation from a derelict building included on its 2007 Most Endangered List to a revitalized architectural treasure.

Photos by Carolyn Brown Courtesy Communities Foundation of Texas
Page 8

AIA Fort Worth 2011 Design Awards

by: Tom Manganiello, Assoc. AIA

Recipients of the AIA Fort Worth’s 2011 Excellence in Design program were announced on Oct. 18 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. Jurors for the annual competition were Julie VandenBerg Snow, FAIA, of Julie Snow Architects in Minneapolis; Chris Carson, FAIA, of Ford Powell & Carson Architects & Planners in San Antonio; and Mark T. Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen Architects in Midland.

Page 18

Raven Lake Ranch

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

Eileen Bennett was leaning toward Arts and Crafts but her architect encouraged her to “come to the dark side.” Modern was a better choice, he insisted, for the splendid acreage she and her husband, local attorney Martin Bennett, had purchased just south of Athens in northeast Texas. Warming to the idea, she asked Michael Malone, AIA, to design a sprawling 2,700-sf house she describes as “modern ranch,” the centerpiece of the couple’s 100-acre Raven Lake Ranch.

Jud Haggard Photography
Page 32

Teaching Tool

by: Donna Kacmar, FAIA

As soon as you’ve parked your car (mine was parked in one of the spaces reserved for high-efficiency vehicles) and walk toward Gloria Marshall Elementary School, you realize this is not your average public school building. The covered path leads you past an “eco-garden”—laid out with individual planting beds for each grade and an adjacent pond, both fed by runoff from the roof drains and rainfall captured in an above-ground 5,000-gallon cistern.

Luis Ayala
Page 48

On the Jobsite with Candid Rogers, AIA

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

It’s just six weeks away from the much-anticipated opening and Candid Rogers, AIA, is walking through his latest project, a former Magnolia Oil service station from the 1920s that is being renovated as a destination dining spot in San Antonio’s nuevo hip Southtown. Subcontractors are readying the floors for millwork scheduled for delivery in a few days. Rogers and his client, local chef Mark Bliss, are both eager to see the custom dining tables in place.

Scott Adams, AIA
Page 67

Lessons in Survival

by: Ed Soltero, AIA

Throughout the history of human civilization, water has been revered as a life-giving force. Unfortunately, some modern societies have exploited this essential natural resource to deleterious extents. In El Paso, however, there’s a beacon of hope for the education of future generations about water conservation in the Chihuahuan Desert.

Carolyn Bowman Photography
Page 80