Texas Architect July/August 2007

Published by the Texas Society of Architects since 1950, the magazine has consistently showcased outstanding architectural design from around the state and chronicled significant events relevant to the profession.

Restored Grandeur

by: Stephen Sharpe

Walking into the recently restored Cameron County Courthouse in Brownsville is like stepping back into a long-lost era when public buildings were designed to give citizens a sense of pride in their local government.

Photos by chris cooper
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Menil Collection Celebrates 20 Years

by: Wendy Price Todd

On April 21 the Menil Collection commemorated its twentieth anniversary with a rare public lecture by its renowned architect Renzo Piano. From the lawn of the acclaimed museum, the architect addressed an audience of more than 1,000 who came to learn about the project that Piano described as a “portrait of a person”—Dominique deMenil. An extraordinary patron, she also is credited for giving his firm, Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW), of Genoa and Paris its first American commission.

george hixson, Hickey-robertson;
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Borderland Modernism

by: William Palmore

“Sustainable design,” the emerging amalgamation of principles and strategies for conserving the use of energy by buildings, is rapidly becoming the most important force in contemporary architecture. Potentially prescriptive, sustainable design strongly implies the need for a very different architecture. Owing to what seems the profession’s long-term habit of neglecting energy conservation, an anxiety surrounds the subject, stimulated by concerns that a designer’s creativity might be restricted or a client’s preferences compromised.

Model and photo by William Palmore; Plan by Thomas Lozada, New York Institue of Technology; © J. Paul Getty trust.
used with permission. julius shulman photograph archive research library at the Getty Trust Institute
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Victory Park

by: David Richter, FAIA

If you have flown into Dallas Love Field at night recently you might have noticed a striking new feature in the urban landscape. It has been likened to Times Square, but from a dark-sky snapshot it seems to harken more to the scale and energy of the Ginza. Either way, this is not the typical Dallas we have come to expect.

illustrations courtesy Hillwood development; photo by jermey woodhouse | pixelchrome.com
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Sumptuous Icon

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: HKS Architects

DALLAS has long had an “edifice complex,” a skyline fixation that certainly isn’t unique among American cities. Given the aggressive business spirit of the city and its constant insecurity about being perceived as “international,” Dallas always has measured itself by the health and style of the downtown’s silhouette.

Blake Marvin
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‘Adventures’ on the Bayou

by: Barrie Scardino

In the six months since Architecture Center Houston opened, ArCH has welcomed more than 2,500 people to a wide range of activities – from workshops and exhibitions to architecture walking tours and even a small concert – but we are most excited about an event coming up this summer.

photographs by joe aker | a-z photography
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