Texas Architect July/August 2012

The projects covered under the theme of “Healthcare and Wellness” are something of a study in contrasts in terms of setting, as in urban vs. bucolic. Compare the rural Chickasaw Nation Medical Center in Ada, Oklahoma, with the CHRISTAS Moran Health Center in midtown Houston. And see two approaches to fitness in the rolling hills of north Dallas (the Northwood Club) and the Tellepsen Family Downtown YMCA in downtown Houston.

To Your Good Health

by: Larry Paul Fuller

In this edition about design for healthcare and wellness, we look at good buildings of both types. But the role of architects in public health goes far beyond their work on the hospitals, clinics, and fitness facilities routinely associated with these two categories. The broader purview includes their role in shaping more livable, sustainable, and healthy communities — the premise being that there is a direct correlation between the design of a community and the health of its people.

Photos by Michael Moran
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David Dillon Symposium Inaugurated in Dallas

by: Lawrence Connolly, AIA

A distinguished group of architecture journalists assembled in Dallas at the end of April to inaugurate the David Dillon Symposium at the Dallas Museum of Art and the Nasher Museum. Former New Yorker architecture critic Paul Goldberger headlined the two-day event and established the tone as keynote speaker on the state of architecture journalism.

Photo by Nicholas McWhirter, AIA
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Health Center, El Cantón, Honduras

by: TA Staff

A small health center for the agrarian village of El Cantón in Honduras is being constructed as the implementation of the winning entry in the “Building Health Challenge” design competition staged in January by Global Architecture Brigades among its university chapters nationwide.

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everyday

by: Larry Paul Fuller

Like the other two books highlighted here, everyday, by Leonard Volk, will be part of the featured activities (including book-signings by authors) in the AIA-Austin-hosted Reading Room at the Texas Society of Architects Convention and Design Expo in Austin October 18-20.

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The Big Picture

by: Val Glitsch, FAIA

In 2008 the YMCA of Greater Houston announced the imminent replacement of Kenneth Franzheim’s Italian Renaissance-inspired ten-story edifice that had provided classrooms, exercise facilities, and 132 single-room residential units since 1941. Aspiring to move in a more “family-friendly” direction, the organization stated the primary goal of the new 115,000-sf facility would be to assume a stronger community presence in downtown Houston.

Aker Imaging, Thomas McConnell
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On the Road with Alexis McKinney, AIA, LEED AP

by: Noelle Heinze

For Alexis McKinney, AIA, the “road to registration” has led to the past. And today, her interest in historic preservation has led to downtown Houston, where McKinney and colleague Gerald Moorhead, FAIA, peruse two historic houses (1904 and 1905) that have been “mothballed” and relocated to a dramatic site yards from the city’s 42,000-seat baseball stadium. The project is one of several McKinney is working on.

Julie Pizzo
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Remembering the Tejanos

by: Larry Paul Fuller

Back in the year 2000, McAllen physician Cayetano Barrera was visiting the Texas Capitol grounds when he noticed that none of their 18 monuments recognized the story of Texas’ early Spanish and Mexican explorers and settlers — an account that dates back to 1519 when Spaniards first arrived on the coast.“ In fact, the history of Texas was being told as if it all started with Anglos at the battle of the Alamo,” says Jaime Beaman, AIA, of Casa Bella Architects in Austin.

Rick Patrick Photography, Julie Pizzo
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