Texas Architect March/April 2013

This issue explores the role of retail development and planning initiatives in the life of communities and city streets, as well as the importance of the experience and functionality of a retail space. Current retail design trends and the value of the rehabilitation of abandoned retail buildings are both explored.

Retail Development and Design

by: Catherine Gavin

Retail design has the potential to go beyond just creating an interesting clean space for product presentation. This issue of Texas Architect looks at how good planning and design create effective community spaces and individual stores with a sense of place.

NorthPark Center and Omniplan
Page 5

Sustained Experience: Lead Pencil Studio’s “Diffuse Reflection Lab”

by: Matt Fajkus, AIA

Artists Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo of Lead Pencil Studio are well-suited to explore the interstitial space between the fine and applied arts. “Diffuse Reflection Lab,” at the University of Texas at Austin Visual Arts Center, is a good example of their careful negotiation between the realms of art and architecture.

Jill Chan and The Artists
Page 10

Cross Timbers Ranch

by: Bart Shaw, AIA

A series of pavilions linked by covered walkways and dogruns create this expansive ranch desgined by Lake Flato in Lipan. Handcrafted elements steeped in vernacular traditions define the character of the home and retreat.

Frank Ooms Photography
Page 22

A Fresh Patina

by: Gregory Ibañez, FAIA

The Gensler-designed Patina store, a new retail concept offering floor and wall-covering products along with in-house interior design consultation in Dallas, is an ambi¬tious attempt by Acme Brick to fill a void in the marketplace while creating an entirely new shopping model.

Bruce Damonte Photography
Page 46

Re-Tailoring Retail

by: Aaron Seward

Three projects — Rackspace Hosting (an internet company in the old Windsor Park Mall in San Antonio), the McAllen Public Library (in an old Walmart), and Montgomery Plaza (a condominium in former Mont¬gomery Ward facility in Fort Worth) — offer a cross section of some of the design concerns and sociological effects of rehabilitating abandoned shopping malls.

Lars Frazer Photography, Boultinghouse Simpson Gates Architects; Lara Swimmer Photography, Craig Smith Photography; Shands Photographics
Page 50

...with Ardis Clinton, AIA

by: Constance Adams, AIA

Ardis Clinton, AIA, is essential to the community at the Perkins+Will Houston office, and when she is not surprising the team with ice cream treats as reprieve from hot summer days or helping young interns with their licensure process, Clinton manages projects like the Galveston National Laboratory biodefense facility and then goes home to twin sons.

Nicole Mlaker
Page 67

Life, Fruits, and Veggies on the Street

by: Andrew Albers, AIA

Since 1994, there has been a 448% increase in the number of farmers markets across the country. Rice University School of Architecture students were given the problem of addressing the spatial needs of the farmers market for the Houston’s not-for-profit Urban Harvest.

Page 76