Texas Architect May/June 2012

This “Urban Design” edition’s four features do not deal with urban design as typified by comprehensive plans for large swaths of urban environment. Rather, they represent four works of architecture that, by virtue of where they are, play important roles in a broader urban context.

Design and Full Circles

by: Larry Paul Fuller

First things first. Regular readers of this magazine will notice that the name attached to this column is not the same as the one appearing here for almost 12 years now. Indeed, the tenure of Stephen Sharpe as editor of Texas Architect has come to an end — as even good things must do.

Julie Pizzo
Page 5

Margaret Hunt Hill Opens to Traffic

by: Michael Malone, AIA

On March 29 the first cars rolled across the long-awaited Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge in Dallas. Designed by Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava, the bridge joins Reunion Tower and Pegasus as a standout on the icon-heavy Dallas skyline. It is named for the matriarch of the Hunt family which, through Hunt Petroleum, donated $12 million to the Trinity River Corridor Project in 2005.

Photos courtesy Craig D. Blackmon , FAIA; Michael Lyon
Page 12

residential architect Award Winner

A Texas house is among 36 winning projects out of nearly 800 entries in the 2012 residential architect Design Awards program. Lake|Flato, of San Antonio, received one of three Merit Awards in the Single-Family Housing category for the Miller Ranch Porch House in Vanderpool.

Page 22

Water, Bridges, and Dreams

by: Joe Self, AIA

The new Tarrant County College (TCC) campus, situated just northeast of the historic county courthouse, should be on any architect’s Fort Worth visit list. However, some background is required to understand how the placement and form of the buildings were developed and, ultimately, why the project was abbreviated.

Nic Lehoux; Craig Kuhner
Page 40

Bungalow Modern

by: Canan Yetmen

In Austin’s richly diverse and energetic East Side neighborhoods, a rebirth is taking place. The addition of the Heywood Hotel on East Cesar Chavez Street represents the latest addition to a burgeoning and thriving East Side culture. Nestled comfortably among the barbecue joints, tacquerias and local shops that have so far eluded big-box homogenization, the hotel builds respectfully on the neighborhood’s considerable charms.

Casey Dunn
Page 60

In the Light with Charles K. Thompson, FAIA

by: Larry Paul Fuller

It’s a Monday morning at Archillume Lighting Design in Austin. Founder Charles Thompson, FAIA, is just now back from a four-day road trip on his 2009 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic. His time on the open road to Big Bend and back has helped to recharge his energy and clear his mind. So he’s ready for whatever awaits him.

Julie Pizzo
Page 67

Is Drawing Dead?

by: Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA

To explore the future of drawing in this digital age, the Yale School of Architecture hosted a symposium February 9-11 entitled “Is Drawing Dead?” Approximately 450 architects, students, historians, theorists, neurologists, digital gurus, and professors gathered in Hastings Hall in the Paul Rudolph-designed School of Architecture building to discuss and debate the question — an issue accentuated by the ready availability of digital drawing resources.

Julie Pizzo
Page 80