Texas Architect September/October 2007

Published by the Texas Society of Architects since 1950, the magazine has consistently showcased outstanding architectural design from around the state and chronicled significant events relevant to the profession.

Rigorous Inquiry

by: Stephen Sharpe

‘I think we’re being a little too tough,’ suggested Peter Bohlin, FAIA, as he and his two fellow jurors were finalizing their decision on this year’s Studio Awards. From a roster of 65 unbuilt entries, the jury had selected only one for an award.

Page 7

In Mississippi, Houston Design Firms Assist Post-Katrina Housing Recovery

by: Kari Smith

Two years after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, the residents of this once-close-knit Mississippi community are still trying to recover from unprecedented devastation. In some areas of East Biloxi, nearly 80 percent of housing is estimated to have been lost or made uninhabitable from the hurricane.

Top photo courtesy MC 2; bottom photo by Brett Zamore
Page 15

Richard Payne’s Texas Towns

by: Thomas McKittrick, FAIA

In his most recent book, Texas Towns and The Art of Architecture: A Photographer’s Journey, Richard Payne, FAIA, chronicles beautiful examples of architecture in small, dying towns across Texas. At the same time, Payne’s images offer glimpses of the waning lives of people in those towns. Texas Architect asked Tom McKittrick, FAIA, to interview Payne about the underlying message he wanted to convey through the book’s black-and-white photographs and his essay that introduces them. Responding to fairly open-ended questions from his long-time friend, Payne touched upon some of these points. Excerpts follow.

Page 26

Design Awards 2007

by: Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA

Having observed this year’s Design Awards jury, I have several thoughts. One is, why doesn’t the Texas landscape/cityscape reflect more significantly the fine work that Texas architects submitted in this year’s design award program?

Photos by Ashley St. Clair
Page 30

Farley Studio

by: Richard Wintersole
Architect: M.J. Neal Architects

After a chance encounter in a Fort Worth bar, things turned out pretty well for Kyle and Angela Farley. It was there the bartender introduced Kyle, a golfer and artist, to MJ Neal, AIA, who just happened to be teaching a design studio at the University of Texas at Arlington.

Viviane Vives; M.J. Neal, AIA
Page 44

Planning Peñitas

by: Danny Boultinghouse, AIA

The small town of Peñitas stands in the cross hairs of progress. Situated along the Río Grande and at the western edge of the uncontrolled sprawl known as the McAllen-Edinburg-Mission metroplex, this community of around 1,200 people faces tremendous pressures that will affect its well-being for generations.

Page 128