Texas Architect September/October 2011

The Design Awards edition profiles the 12 projects selected by this year’s jury. Collectively, these award-winning projects represent the diversity of our state’s architectural profession and the increasing role that architects from Texas play in the globalized forum of design.

Firm Philosophy

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

Lake/Flato Architects is well known for exemplary design. Every year the firm’s commitment to producing the highest quality work is rewarded by design juries. In this edition you’ll find features on five Lake/Flato projects selected for 2011 Design Awards out of a total of 12 winners in the Texas Society of Architects annual competition.

Photos Courtesy Lake/Flato  Architects
Page 10

Nature and Human Nature

by: Max Levy, FAIA

Our nineteenth-century Texas forebears lived more closely with nature than we do, but of course they had little choice in the matter. Though we sometimes romanticize that close relationship, most early Texans probably would have traded the romance for a window unit air conditioner. Nevertheless, they made the most of their situation and there remains much that we can learn from them about the intersection of daily lives, architecture, and nature.

All Photos By Max Levy, Faia, With Exception Of Next Page Top Left Photo Courtesy Fort Worth Public Library And Amon Carter Museum; Next Page Top Right Photo Courtesy Fort Worth Museum Of Science And History
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Notes on the Jury

by: Michael Malone, AIA

On May 20, the 2011 design awards jury met to review the 257 entries submitted in this year’s program. The distinguished jury consisted of three exceptional professionals with diverse practice and professional experiences, along with a considerable love of architecture and design.

Photos By Julie Pizzo
Page 38

Arthouse at the Jones Center

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: LTL Architects

While it is not unusual for a renovation project to transform an individual building, it is noteworthy when such a project begins to change how people relate to the city around them.

Michael Moran
Page 44

Blog of an Architect

by: Bob Borson, AIA

Last may, the number of websites was expected to exceed 324 million. That’s a lot of competition for architects who want their message heard. A more focused alternative is to create a blog and use social media to reach your target audience. The key word is “social” because it allows for an interactive dialogue between two or more people who share a common interest.

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