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Intersecting Interests

In 1971, the Los Angeles-based artist Robert Irwin embarked on a solitary driving tour of the country’s perimeter. A year earlier, he had completed an installation at the Museum of Modern Art that — while unnoted by the art world — had led to an important personal breakthrough, leading him to leave his studio for good and embark on a new phase of a career in which he has routinely questioned and shed the inessential. The MOMA installation transformed a small, squat room through three site-specific interventions indicated by the title of the work: ”Fractured Light” — “Partial Scrim Ceiling”…

Between Green and Violet

It’s easy to fall in love with Marfa, Texas. The effort of getting there is rewarded by the treasures revealed — Donald Judd’s perfect metal boxes, his Chinati Foundation’s rows of barracks filled with world-class art, the galleries and art studios. There’s the historic town square with its Second Empire style courthouse, and the beauty of the landscape — the desert; the scrubby plains; the crisp, clean air; the darkest of dark skies at night; and the unyieldingly bright sun by day — it’s a unique experience.  For architect Rand Elliott, FAIA, who lives and works in Oklahoma City but…

Rand Elliott’s Word Paintings

For Rand Elliott, FAIA, the creative process transcends conventional divisions between artistic disciplines. For Elliott, language and architecture — the output of his professional practice — are intimately connected.  Marfa Contemporary Gallery by Elliott + Associates Architects – photo by Scott McDonald, Hedrich Blessing "The words arrive before the architecture," writes Rand Elliott, FAIA, in his 2014 book, "Word Paintings." "Words, sentence fragments, dissimilar pairings of adjectives, and the imagining of a place yet to be created… The words liquefy and reform as an architectural spirit in time." Elliott’s process for transforming a 1940s-era Gulf service station into the Marfa Contemporary…

Beyond the Boardroom: TxA Board Meets in Marfa

The subject of this post belies my column’s name as it is in fact all about the boardroom….The Texas Architects board of directors meets once in each quarter of the year. Our first quarter meeting is always in Austin and the last is always at our Annual Convention and Design Expo. The sites for the second and third quarter meetings are selected by the current Society president, with these parameters: the second meeting should be at a Texas site other than one of the five convention cities, and the third at an out-of-state site of high architectural interest.  This year’s second quarter board meeting took place…