Posts

Blast from the Past

Recently, TxA received a postcard from Robert Bumann of Florida. A piece of architectural history, the card depicts a building at The University of Texas at Austin that no longer exists. The Old Main building, originally the first permanent structure on the campus, was completed in 1899, 16 years after classes first began. A Victorian Gothic masterpiece of yellow brick, the building housed several different academic facilities. The first subject to be moved out of the palatial Old Main was chemistry, as the fumes from the labs and dangerous chemicals were a cause for concern. A chemistry building was built…

Update: UT Living Wall

The first living wall at The University of Texas at Austin has been installed.  Check out this video of the finished product: UT Austin Installs First Living Wall on Campus from University of Texas at Austin on Vimeo. Learn more about UT's living wall project here. 

UT Austin to Install Living Wall Five Years in the Making

The wall will be built over a honeycomb-shaped trellis and extend to the ground – rendering courtesy UTSOA On May 16, volunteers will come together to install a living wall at The University of Texas at Austin. The project is funded by the school’s Green Fee Award. Spearheaded by UT Austin Vice President for Operations Pat Clubb, the living wall project is being shepherded by Assistant Professor Danelle Briscoe. The idea for the wall was put forth by a former Austin city councilman, Chris Riley. The first wall will be installed on the northwest corner of the school of architecture, with others…

Social Studies

Much of the extraordinary energy of the early Modern Movement in architecture focused on the notion that the built environment could have a profound impact on the everyday lives of ordinary people. Architects like Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, Walter Gropius and Alvar Aalto were not designing museums and prestigious corporate headquarters in the 1920s and ’30s, but were focused instead on schools, healthcare facilities, housing and urban design, and on their potential for creating social benefit. Over the decades that followed, sociologists and psychologists would join architects in studying and projecting environments that could support and promote desirable…

UTSOA Studio to Bring the WATNEY to SXSW

The WATNEY will be installed at Republic Square Park in Austin during SXSW Eco – rendering courtesy Kory Bieg The Bieg Design V studio at The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture is currently designing an ambitious installation project called WATNEY to be on display at SXSW Eco this March. The installation will be designed and built by a group of 13 students, led by Assistant Professor Kory Bieg. The design explores how digital software and fabrication techniques can be applied to art and architecture and offers a new way of using waffle, or structural rib-systems, for the construction of complex forms.…

What Starts Here …

Even an Aggie would have to admit that The University of Texas at Austin has an impressive campus. The Spanish-Mediterranean buildings that define its core are stately to be sure, but so too are the landscaped malls and courtyards in between them. Framed by the red tile roofs that pop against the blue of the Texas sky, these outdoor rooms are as recognizably part of the campus as the buildings themselves.  As the university has grown, it has faced the opportunities and challenges that come with building on a campus defined by a historic core. Some eras produced better buildings…

Architects Talking to Architects: Danelle Briscoe, Assoc. AIA

Danelle Briscoe, Assoc. AIA, is an assistant professor at The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture. Danelle Briscoe, Assoc. AIA – photo by Whit Preston Where did you grow up? I was born and raised in Galveston. I loved growing up on an island, especially one with so much history. The historic architecture engrained an appreciation for permanence from things that are well designed and made. At the same time, all the hurricanes and storms I experienced first-hand taught me how unstable anything can be in the face of the natural environment. If you were had not studied architecture, what…

Latitudes: Architecture in the Americas

In 2009, the “Latitudes: Architecture in the Americas” symposia were organized for the first time by The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture and the Center for American Architecture and Design, initiated by architects and UT Austin faculty Kevin Alter, Assoc. AIA; Michael Benedikt; Barbara Hoidn; and Wilfried Wang. Soon after, the symposia were supported by and organized in cooperation with the Teresa Lozano Long Institute for Latin American Studies (LLILAS) at UT Austin, represented by Fernando Lara, chair of the Brazil Center.  The annual two-day event brings together a diverse group of innovative architects to explore the…

Exploring Future Workflows with TEX-FAB

There is an upcoming generation of architects who love to make things. These young designers are engaging in sophisticated workflows between design and construction that are laying the foundation for a newly organized architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry. For those of us who have been practicing for some time, often in disbelief and astonishment at how buildings get built, this is really good news.  As an industry, we are in the early stages of what promises to be a paradigm shift in how architects, fabricators, and construction teams work together. It is enabled by new digital tools and techniques,…