Article Results for "FAIA"

Nature and Human Nature

by: Max Levy, FAIA

Our nineteenth-century Texas forebears lived more closely with nature than we do, but of course they had little choice in the matter. Though we sometimes romanticize that close relationship, most early Texans probably would have traded the romance for a window unit air conditioner. Nevertheless, they made the most of their situation and there remains much that we can learn from them about the intersection of daily lives, architecture, and nature.

All Photos By Max Levy, Faia, With Exception Of Next Page Top Left Photo Courtesy Fort Worth Public Library And Amon Carter Museum; Next Page Top Right Photo Courtesy Fort Worth Museum Of Science And History
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Singing Bell Ranch

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Max Levy Architect

The term Max Levy, FAIA, uses to describe the weekend house he designed for Singing Bell Ranch is “ranch pragmatism.” The clients asked for a design that was functional and simple, which Levy provided in the form of an elongated rectangle oriented on an east-west axis to catch the prevailing breezes.“

Charles Smith
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Pitts Medal Goes to Cowan For Lifetime Achievement

by: Andrea Exter

Described as a “legend” by his peers, Tommy N. Cowan, FAIA, is a dedicated and lifelong leader. His interest in design and architecture began in the fifth grade when a teacher invited him to compete in Austin’s Wellesley Junior Art Show. Two of Cowan’s architectural drawings were submitted and both won top honors.

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AIA Brazos Honors Five Projects

by: Elizabeth Price, AIA

Five projects were recognized in July with AIA Brazos Design Awards from a total of 16 entries. Jurors were Michael Malone, AIA, of Michael Malone Architects in Dallas; Emily Little, FAIA, of Clayton & Little Architects in Austin; and Mark T. Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen Architects in Midland.

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Dance Partner

by: Geoffrey Brune, FAIA

What makes a building an icon? One characteristic is distinct contrast with its context, in form and/or exterior material, that draws attention to the building and away from its surroundings.

Nic Lehoux
Page 60

The Many Shades of Green

by: Duncan T. Fulton FAIA

There are many ways for a building to be “green.” While LEED may be the best known, it is by no means the only way, nor necessarily
always the best.

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Oliver Named UH Architecture Dean

by: TA Staff

Patricia Belton Oliver, FAIA, who served from 2001-2008 as senior vice president of educational planning and architecture at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif., has been named dean of the Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture at the University of Houston. Oliver succeeds Joe Mashburn, AIA, who held the post for the last 11 years.

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Perot Museum of Nature and Science

Construction began in November on the Perot Museum of Nature and Science on a 4.7-acre site in the Victory development just north of downtown Dallas. Thom Mayne, FAIA, of Morphosis, designed the $185 million project as a mammoth cube that appears to float over a landscaped plinth.

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New Texas Fellows Announced

by: TA Staff

Fourteen Texans are among the 134 architects elevated by the AIA to its prestigious College of Fellows, an honor awarded to members who have made contributions of national significance to the profession.

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Jury Selected for Design Awards

by: TA Staff

With the deadline having passed on April 23 for the 2010 TSA Design Awards, three jurors have been selected to review this year’s entries on May 21 at the TSA offices. The jurors are Adèle Naudé Santos, FAIA, dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning and a principal of Santos Prescott and Associates in San Francisco; Tom Phifer, FAIA, of Thomas Phifer and Partners in New York; and Edward Bosley, director of the Gamble House in Pasadena, Calif., and an art historian on the faculty of the USC’s School of Architecture. They were chosen by the TSA Design Awards Committee, chaired by Michael Malone, AIA.

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Making a Case for Research

by: Jesse Hager

In their recent book, Evidence-Based Design for Multiple Building Types, David Watkins, FAIA, and Kirk Hamilton, FAIA, offer case studies involving several built projects that illustrate the importance of empirical research for the benefit of architects and owners. Though often associated with healthcare design, the authors state that evidence-based design is a methodology that can be used in any sort of architectural practice.

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AIA Austin Awards 15 Projects

by: Rick Price

Fifteen projects were selected for the 2010 AIA Austin Design Awards in April. The jury was comprised of Merrill Elam, AIA, of Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects in Atlanta, Ga.; Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, of Marlon Blackwell Architect in Fayetteville, Ark.; and Michael Imber, FAIA, of Michael G. Imber Architects in San Antonio. The three jurors reviewed over 100 submittals at the AIA Austin Center for Architecture.

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Jury Chosen for TSA Studio Awards

by: TA Staff

This year’s TSA Studio Awards will be judged by three Arizona architects, each respected for design work and commitment to sustainable architecture. Comprising the jury is Wendell Burnette, FAIA, of Wendell Burnette Architects in Phoenix; John Kane, FAIA, a founding principal of Architekton in Tempe: and Philip Weddle, AIA, of Weddle Gilmore Black Rock Studio in Scottsdale.

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Slender Profile

According to Scott Ziegler, FAIA, the slenderness ratio of the building maximizes the possibilities of the concrete structure. To go any higher, he says, would have required more exotic structural strategies common in the world’s tallest buildings, such as the Sears Tower or the Burj Dubai.

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Texas’ Influence Rises at AIA

by: Stephen Sharpe

Two recent events have raised the national stature of the AIA’s Texas component, the state with the third-largest membership in the American Institute of Architects. In June, during the AIA convention in Miami, delegates elected Jeff Potter, FAIA, of Dallas as the 2011 first vice president/president-elect, which will evolve into the 2012 AIA presidency.

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Survivors

by: Mort Levy, FAIA

Following the devastation of Hurricane Ike in September 2008, an engineer emerged from under the battered substructure of Galveston’s First Presbyterian Church to apprise Rev. David Green of the damage. “Pastor, your church has no foundation,” he said, apparently without thinking his statement’s underlying irony. Yes, perhaps its structural foundation was in need of repair, but the spiritual foundation of First Presbyterian, a survivor of more than a century of catastrophic weather events, has never weakened.

(Above) Photo Courtesy Library of Congress, LC-US Z62-126820 DLC, Prints & Photographs Division, HABS LC-US Z62 -126820 (Below) ‘Ike’ photo Courtesy FEMA; ‘1900’ Photo Courtesy Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, HABS LC-US Z62-120220
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The Perils of Substitutions - Part II

by: Jim Atkins, FAIA, and Grant A. Simpson, FAIA

Substitutions can carry many unbalanced risks for architects, but they are likely to endure, as we observed in Part I of this two-part series. The perceived positive results for owners and contractors will allow substitutions to prevail as a popular cost-reducing exercise, and architects will be expected to accept them and bear responsibility for their performance.

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TSA Announces 2010 Honor Awards

by: Noelle Heinze

During its 71st annual convention in San Antonio, Oct. 14-16, the Texas Society of Architects recognized the following as this year’s Honor Award recipients for significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment.

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Richard Ferrier, FAIA (1944-2010)

by: Ron Kent, AIA

Richard Ferrier’s life was like a series of his watercolors—transparent at first, then opaque, and finally transparent again as he shared his heart and soul to his students and friends. When painting, he would begin by masking off the borders and soaking the page with water. Then came the magic as he blended cobalt blue and yellow ochre, mixtures that would then bleed into the wet parchment and travel as the angle set by his hands allowed. His life was like that, a magical work of art created from a broad range of hues.

Craig Kuhner
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Romanian Adventure

by: J. Tom Ashley, FAIA

Sometime after midnight in May 2009, I arrived in the Romanian capital of Bucharest as part of the twenty-sixth group of Peace Corps volunteers to serve in this former Soviet bloc country. All 37 of us had met in Washington, D.C., for orientation before flying together overseas.

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The Problem with Owners

by: Barbara White Bryson, FAIA, and Canan Yetmen

A few months ago, a senior leader at a top-ranked university asked the assistant vice president of facilities and construction what he and his office were doing to capture construction savings related to the deflating market, especially as they were completing the buyout of remaining major projects.

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Clyde Porter Receives AIA Young Award

by: Stephen Sharpe

For his efforts to encourage minority, under-served, and low-income students to pursue careers as architects, the American Institute of Architects’ Board of Directors has selected Clyde Porter, FAIA, as the 2009 recipient of the Whitney M. Young Jr. Award.

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A Resonant Ensemble

by: Willis Winters, FAIA
Architect: Allied Works Architecture; Booziotis & Company Architects

It is early afternoon at the new arts magnet school in downtown Dallas. Classes are in session and there is considerable activity in the building’s loft-like corridors. Students can be found working on class projects, but these are not the kinds of activities and assignments typically encountered in a high school curriculum.

Helene Binet; Jeremy Bittermann; Willis Winters, FAIA
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Seventeen Texans Elevated as Fellows

by: TA Staff

The AIA 2009 Jury of Fellows elevated 17 Texans, along with 95 other architects from around the U.S., to the College of Fellows, in recognition of their contributions to the profession.

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Campus Conversion

by: Kurt Neubek, FAIA and John Clegg, AIA
Architect: HarrisonKornberg Architects

The Houston Community College (HCC) System is one of the nation’s largest, with 23 locations across the metropolitan area. Since its creation in 1971, the system has acquired a diverse range of facilities and adapted them for educational purposes.

Michael Stravato
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AT&T Conference Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: HKS Architects (architect of record) and Lake|Flato Architects (design architect)

The AT &T Executive Education and Conference Center opened in 2008 on the University of Texas campus in Austin. Designed by Lake/Flato Architects, in collaboration with HKS, the conference center “…adheres to goals of the campus master plan by borrowing very specifically from the materials of the campus as well as the massing and the fenestration of the original 40 acres,” said principal design architect David Lake, FAIA .

Blake Martin, HKS
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TSA Design Awards Jury Selected

by: TA Staff

Three highly respected designers will judge the entries in the 2009 TSA Design Awards program. The jurors will be Philip Freelon, FAIA, president of the Freelon Group in Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, president of San Francisco-based landscape architecture firm Hargreaves Associates; and Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects in Tucson. The jury is set to meet May 15 in Austin.

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Survival in Challenging Times

by: Jim Atkins, FAIA and Grant A. Simpson, FAIA

Here we go again; another recession. And since the work of the design professional is directly related to the economy, our livelihood thrives or suffers accordingly. Those good times that seemed as though they would never end seem to have ended, at least for the present. Projects have gone on hold, or away, friends have been laid off, and many employees are now wanting for something meaningful to do.

Photo illustrations by Julie Pizzo; sketch courtesy merr iman associates/architects
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Neighbors

by: Stephen Fox

Architectural historian Virginia McAlester; architect and historian Willis Winters, FAIA; journalist Prudence Mackintosh; and photographer Steve Clicque have produced an extraordinary work on the history and architecture of Dallas’ two best-known twentieth-century residential communities, Highland Park and University Park.

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Building in ‘Enough’

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Nonya Grenader, FAIA

The site for the house Nonya Grenader, FAIA, designed for her family in Houston was selected for the beauty of the existing trees and shade and its ideal proximity as a construction site. Intimately acquainted with the amenities of the Southampton neighborhood, a deed-restricted subdivision near Rice, the Grenaders had lived next door for 11 years before their elderly neighbor offered to sell them her house in 1997. The 55x130-foot lot presented an opportunity to create a new environment tailored to their long-established live/work lifestyle.

Nash Baker Photographer
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Solid Classicist

by: Jon Thompson
Architect: RVK Architects ; Michael G. Imber, Architect; B&A Architects

The 14-story Vistana is the first major apartment project built in downtown San Antonio in the last decade. Texas Architect asked Jon Thompson to interview Ed Cross of Cross & Co., the developer of the project, and Michael Imber, FAIA, the designer of the building’s exterior.

Kathy Castanon, RVK Architects
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Brown Seeks Mayor’s Office in Houston Stressing Wide Architectural Experience

by: Barrie Scardino

Peter H. Brown, FAIA, announced his candidacy for mayor of Houston in February. With more than 30 years’ experience practicing in Houston, the architect also has served on the City Council since winning election in 2005 and re-election in 2007. He recently sat down with AIA Houston Executive Director Barrie Scardino to outline his objectives should he be elected when voters go to the polls on Nov. 3.

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New Opera House and Theater Opens; Dallas Arts District Nears Completion

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

October 12 marks the long-awaited grand opening of the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts (DCPA), a multiple-venue complex located in the Dallas Arts District that includes a new opera house and outdoor performance park designed by Foster + Partners, a multiform theater designed by REX/OMA (Kendall/Heaton was the associate architect for both projects), and a 10-acre public park designed by the French landscape architect Michel Desvigne.

Photos by Willis Winters, FAIA
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Design Awards 2009

The 2009 TSA Design Awards jury met in Austin on May 15 to view 261 submittals of built work. The jurors were Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, of Hargreaves Associates (San Francisco, Cambridge, and New York); Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects (Tucson); and Philip Freelon, FAIA, of the Freelon Group (Durham, N.C.)

Illustrations by Bryce Weigand
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Eclectic Ensemble

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture with Michael Hsu Design Office

When Antoine Predock, FAIA, was in midst of conceiving the new Austin City Hall, he commented that the city was “terminally democratic.” He made the remark after his design survived a protracted review process that included more than a dozen town meetings and hearings before the City Council. A similar sort of public scrutiny – albeit on a smaller, neighborhood scale – resulted when Dick Clark Architecture added a zoning non-compliant residential building to its 1400 South Congress mixed-use project.

Paul Bardagjy; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
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Terminal Clarity

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Corgan with HKS and HNTB

Discussing Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Terminal D and its selection for a 2009 TSA Design Award, juror Philip Freelon, FAIA, said, “We thought that the project was a very good example of a public building, very prominent, but it still was handled with quite some sensitivity. We all have been in airports, probably more than we’d like, and this is one where you actually feel a sense of light and airy space, which is relaxing. Natural light was well used, and the high volume of the space gives it an open and comfortable feeling. We thought it was well worthy of an award.”

Craig Blackmon, FAIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
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Concrete Poetry

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: Elliott + Associates Architects

This word painting by Rand Elliott, FAIA, explains how he wants people to understand his latest award-winning project, ImageNet of Houston. Employing poetry or manifestoes to describe one’s work is not uncommon these days. Indeed, such material appears to be a prerequisite of the current media culture that promotes “starchitects,” “signature architects,” and one-hit wonders. Supportive text is, we are led to believe, required reading. If a building appears mundane, baffling, or otherwise underwhelming, just refer to the narrative. Within the architect’s words, we are told, lies the true meaning which will assure in our prosaic times that, yes, this is Architecture.

Scott McDonald, Hedrich Blessing; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
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Peterson Is First Woman To Receive Top TSA Honor

by: Mary Carolyn Hollers George

Carolyn Peterson, FAIA, is the forty-first recipient of the Texas Society of Architect’s highest award – the Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Honor of Llewellyn W. Pitts FAIA – presented annually to a TSA member for contributions to the profession of architecture and their community. From its inception in 1968 until this year, the honor’s awardees have been exclusively male.

photo courtesy Ken Slavin
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Drawn to Architecture

by: Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA

These drawings are excerpts from sketchbooks complied over the past 33 years. Presented in our Good Fulton & Farrell University (for AIA learning unit credits), they formed the structure of the presentations: “Drawn to Architecture: Sketches to Reality.”

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Bullish on Materials

by: Malcolm Holzman, FAIA

Architecture for me is not about concealment but rather about divulging its very nature to the widest possible audience. Materials are not a mystery; they are an essential building ingredient, our heritage, and part of our everyday lives.

Photos by Tom Kessler
Page 88

Child’s Play

by: Stephen Sharpe

The best architects practicing today are essentially grown-up children, says Max Levy, FAIA, without a hint of disparagement. Drawing by hand releases a child-like sense of wonder, he explains. Unfortunately, by the time they reach adulthood, most designers have forgotten that feeling of creative release.

drawing by max levy, faia
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AIA Fort Worth Awards 5 Projects

by: Ivonne Levin, AIA

The local chapter of the AIA recognized four projects in the General Design category and one project in the Mayor’s Award category in ceremonies that took place at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. The members of the 2007 jury were Julie Eizenberg, AIA, of Koning Eizenberg Architecture in Los Angeles; Errol Barron, FAIA, of Errol Barron/Michael Toups in New Orleans; and Kevin Alter, Assoc. AIA, of Alterstudio Architects in Austin.

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AIA Honors McKittrick with Kemper Award

Thomas McKittrick, FAIA, of Houston is the 2008 recipient of the Edward C. Kemper Award for his contributions to the profession through service to the American Institute of Architects. In 1991, he was honored with TSA’s Llewellyn W. Pitts Award (now called the Lifetime Achievement Medal), the Society’s highest recognition for an architect member.

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Trinity River Corridor Approved (Again)

by: Duncan T Fulton, FAIA

On Nov. 6, Dallas voters endorsed development of the Trinity River Corridor in general, and local government’s specific vision in particular. This was the second time in 10 years the electorate had been called to the polls on the issue. The first occurred in 1998 when the voters approved a $246 million bond issue for development of the corridor. The second election was a referendum challenging specific aspects of how the plan had developed since 1998.

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Pfluger Bridge Extension

The project will extend the James D. Pfluger Bicycle and Pedestrian Bridge northward to connect the Lady Bird Lake hike-and-bike trail to the Lamar Corridor and downtown. The bridge, completed in 2001, is named in the memory of James D. Pfluger, FAIA, who helped push the City of Austin’s development of the popular lakeside trail system.

Page 20

Encouraging Excellence While Maintaining Standards

by: David G Woodcock, FAIA

In November 2004 the Association for Preservation Technology International (APT) held its annual conference in Galveston. The conference theme, “Raising the Grade for Preservation,” was a play on words easily understood by the participants who were familiar with the heroic aftermath of the Great Storm of 1900 that resulted in the building of a protective seawall, a seven-year effort that added several feet of sand across much of the city, and the lifting of many surviving buildings from the threat of future storms.

Photo by Jason Jennings courtesy The Williams Company Architects
Page 61

Jury Selected for 2008 Design Awards

The jury for the 2008 TSA Design Awards will be arts writer Judith Dupré and architects Steven Ehrlich, FAIA, and Billie Tsien, AIA. The three are scheduled to meet June 27 in Austin to review entries and make their selections. The deadline for entries is May 30.

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Sustainable Healthcare Design

by: Stephen Sharpe

Gail Vittori is co-author of Sustainable Healthcare Architecture (Wiley Press, 2008) with Robin Guenther, FAIA. As co-director of the Center for Maximum Potential Building Systems, Vittori also helped develop the Green Guide for Health Care (www.gghc.org) and chairs the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED for Healthcare Committee. TA Editor Stephen Sharpe recently nterviewed Vittori about her book and her purpose in writing it.

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RFI Shootout

by: Grant A. Simpson, FAIA, and Jim Atkins, FAIA

The architect’s documents in this part of the world have always been inherently conceptual. Additional information has typically been required by the contractor from the architect during the construction phase.

Page 67

TSA Medal for Lifetime Achievement

Velpeau (Vel) E. Hawes Jr., FAIA, graduated in 1958 with a bachelor of architecture degree from Texas A&M University in College Station. After four years of service as an infantry officer, he began a 38-year career as a licensed architect and licensed interior designer with several architectural firms in Dallas, including Omniplan, HOK, and PGAL.

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